Posted in social spotlight

Social Spotlight: Jo Taylor

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This week I am thrilled to kick off the social spotlight interview series again with one of my favourite people – Jo Taylor.  Founder of After Breast Cancer Diagnosis, Jo is a straight-talking Northerner and a force of nature. A fearless patient advocate and campaigner living with secondary breast cancer, she inspires me every day with her energy and passion.


Jo, I am in awe of the work you do. I know you have several projects on the go, so can you tell us a little about some that are close to your heart right now?

JT:  Currently I’m working on my #abcdretreat .  I held 3 this year and the plan is to get sustainable funding that can support 5 residential a year and other additional ones but not redirecting.  I want to be able to franchise the model as people have now asked my advice in replicating.  I know it works and I can inject the right ideas and know how into producing them in different areas.

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A lady from the last retreat wants the franchise in the Isle of Wight!  I’ve also had interest from America and Canada.  Social media reaches the places others can’t.  It’s unbelievable how it’s grown in the last 2 years.  I did a pilot 2 years ago with 9 breast cancer people.  I now know how it works best and people gain so much out of it!  There’s lots of ideas but can’t say too much at the moment.  A business plan is in the process and there are two other grant funds that again I can’t talk about that I’ve applied for.  Only time will tell if these things work out.  Fingers crossed.

I’m also involved in the #busylivingwithmets campaign that started last month in Breast Cancer Awareness Month. While metastatic breast cancer is terminal and cannot be cured, because of improved treatments more women are living longer than ever with it. Even so, many misconceptions and lack of information about this diagnosis persist.    A stranger called Elizabeth Richards contacted me and like many other women she knew very little about MBC, yet the more she found out, the more angry and amazed she became that the illness was side-lined. Elizabeth’s view was that as long as metastatic cancer wasn’t mainstream people would not be aware of the limited treatment options available to them. If they knew, they’d demand more.

NICE, NHS, charities there’s so much not happening and it should be.  Secondary breast cancer patients need a real voice to push policy and make changes – patients need early diagnosis of mets, better treatments and surgeries.  If the government really want the life expectancy to improve and the U.K. world cancer ranking to improve from 17th position, these are the things that are needed to make this happen.

I also am the founder of METUPUK who are looking at the aims and objectives detailed in the graphic below, and we’re committed to turning metastatic (secondary) breast cancer into a chronic disease instead of a terminal disease.

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I’m also involved in steering groups for Experimental Cancer Medicine Centre (ECMC) in Greater Manchester and in the Greater Manchester User Involvement programme working in partnership with clinical groups and boards like the Greater Manchester Breast Pathway Board which I attend as Secondary Breast Cancer patient representative.

I truly am in awe of all that you do Jo! So, tell us what role social media plays in all of this work. How did you get started with social media?

JT: All these things use social media to push their profile. I was on Twitter with my own personal account and wanted to see how Twitter worked and how I could use it after creating my website After Breast Cancer Diagnosis – I spent a good year or so researching and understanding how it worked to be able to replicate this with my @abcdiagnosis Twitter account. I didn’t want to just take followers over from a personal account. Many did follow me from my personal account but it grew from there to what it is today.

Which platform(s) do you enjoy using the most?

JT:  I use Twitter as my main platform. I have a Facebook page as well which I then expand on the information from Twitter as FB is wordier. I don’t link one media to the other as I feel it doesn’t work for me. I don’t use Instagram as I don’t feel this is a worthwhile medium for abcd. I find it unrealistic and more of a “celebrity” medium that just isn’t what I want to promote. Life isn’t all about the perfect photo and I am a real person not a posed and promoted one. I also feel this is damaging to people and our children. I don’t feel my “brand” is right on that medium.

I agree that Instagram is all about the filters and the projection of a perfect image, but I wonder if it might be worth experimenting a little to see if you could do something to shake this up? We should put our heads together sometime and see what we can come up with 😉 

I ask all my guests the following question – but I probably should know the answer to the next question already. Which topics interest you – eg do you take part in any particular twitter chats?

JT: Any topics to do with breast cancer, secondary BC, patient involvement, advocacy interest me. I’m also massively interested in exercise with and after cancer so get involved in things to do with these subjects. I want to make a difference for other patients and people living with and beyond cancer. Exercise is something we can all do and at very little cost so I like to motivate people to do this.

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I have a closed FB group for people who have been on the retreats and it’s great for them to keep motivated. We also have WhatsApp groups that keep them motivated and connected.

What advice would you give someone just starting out on social media?

JT: Connecting with people and actually chat with them! This is the one thing people don’t always do, they think they will just get followers by no interaction, I’ve seen it. You have to be part of the conversation, don’t be shy, talk, get involved, do Twitter chats, lurk until you feel comfortable in speaking but we all have an opinion and that’s the thing, we don’t have to agree. Don’t feel silly to stick your head above the parapet and have an opinion. Be kind – many people have cancer and sometimes things can be taken incorrectly too (Maybe my Northernness?!) I’ve been on the receiving end and sometimes easy to be misunderstood. Don’t feel silly to say I’m sorry I didn’t mean it that way also, I still can say something and the meaning isn’t taken in the right context. If something happens DM someone and there’s been times I’ve apologised or smoothed things over. Interaction is everything though, it’s just like speaking to someone face to face. Remember don’t say something to someone you wouldn’t face to face. There are real people behind these accounts (most of the time). Block anyone who is continually rude or upsetting. I’ve only had to block three people ever in the last 6 years and most of the time I’ve had only a good experience of social media.

I love that advice Jo, and I agree that is easy for misunderstandings to arise online. I appreciate that you care enough to smooth things over. It’s important that we build and nurture those online relationships we value too. 

So, finally, would you like to share a favourite quote with us?

Favourite quote – too many to choose from but this resonates – no, exercise won’t cure clinical depression but whatever disease or problem, it certainly can make you feel a whole lot better if you try it.

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That’s a powerful note to end on Jo, and as healthcare communicators, we both understand the value of a visual to get a key point across!


This post is part of an ongoing conversation that explores how patients, healthcare professionals, and researchers use social media to communicate their work. For more interviews, click here

Posted in social spotlight

Social Spotlight: Claire Whitehouse

This week I am delighted to kick off the social spotlight interview series again with Claire Whitehouse, lead nurse for research at The James Paget University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and founder of the #WhyWeDoResearch global campaign.


I love the #WhyWeDoResearch campaign. Can you tell us some more about how it started?

CW:  In 2014 I decided to introduce my team to our local population using twitter as our social media platform. I tweeted using our Research and Development handle @JPUHResearch and having explored the use of twitter for a few months prior to this, I had identified that photographs received the most attention, retweets and ‘favourites’. To introduce our team I decided to release one photo, name and job title per day along-with the individual holding a placard upon which they had written the reason why they personally are involved in research. There was born #WhyWeDoResearch. I had intended this would be for the 12 days of Christmas as a Christmas campaign. Within four days Michael Keeling (@keeling_michael ‏) of York Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust had picked up on it and from there it became a National campaign, at which point it was extended throughout the Christmas period. By the new year it had reached Canada and Australia and became known globally. Now, two years later it is in 23 countries globally, with >15,000 separate accounts participating and >250 MILLION impressions on the hashtag. I lead the campaign entirely voluntarily and there are other individuals who support this lead eg Hazel Smith who is based in Dublin. I am also involved in the Health and Research through Social Media (HARTSofthepossible) project which aims to drive health research through and using social media.

I really love how you have created these grass-roots campaigns. How did you first get started using social media professionally?  

CW:  The Executive Team at the JPUH decided to set up a Trust twitter account and asked departments to raise a hand if they wished to host a departmental account. The Head of Research and I felt this would be a sensible step to take (being research and development) so I volunteered to host the account and take the plunge (as I felt it was at the time). I recognised that there might be individuals or groups considered ‘hard to reach’ who were missing out on research opportunities and we all know social media is a growing entity. I’d used facebook in my personal life and joined twitter as a social media platform for my professional life

Which platform(s) do you enjoy using the most?

CW:  I focus on twitter as it’s so easy to use and has an extremely large reach. The @wenurses team have a fantastic tool called twitterversity which helps people get started.

That’s fantastic! I can probably guess the answer to this next question, but do tell us more about which topics interest you on Twitter? Do you take part in any particular twitter chats?

CW:  Regular twitter chats are hosted using #whywedoresearch – the topics vary depending on who volunteers or what conversations are happening at the time, this is the beauty of twitter, you can create live chats and people will always be interested. In 2016 we hosted the worlds first research tweetfest in May to coincide with International Clinical Trials Day. We can’t claim entire credit as an idea as it grew (as most things do) from a small idea. I tweeted (from my bed) one Saturday morning 2 weeks before ICTD and asked #whywedoresearch followers if they would like a tweetchat on ICTD. By that afternoon I had 11 individuals offering to host chats and within 48 hours we had set up over 20 chats and coined the phrase #tweetfest. The 2017 tweetfest is over 2 weeks from Monday 15th May and there are 31 chats to choose from.

What advice would you give someone just starting out on social media?

CW: Don’t be scared. Embrace it and go for it.

Finally, would you like to share a favourite quote with us?

“Words are, in my not-so-humble opinion, our most inexhaustible source of magic” _- Albus Dumbledore

Thanks Claire for taking the time to share with us your experience of using social media in your work. I look forward to seeing your campaigns grow and prosper over the coming months. 


Posted in #HCSM

Social Spotlight: Iris Thiele Isip Tan

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This week it is my great pleasure to interview endocrinologist Iris Tan, MD, MSc, who teaches at the University of the Philippines College of Medicine.  A TedX speaker, Iris is one of the co-founders of the #HealthXPH tweet chat and annual healthcare and social media conference.


Hi Iris, I’ve been an admirer of your work since I first started following you three years ago on Twitter. In that time I’ve watched your social media presence evolve and grow year-on-year. Can you tell us how you use social media in a healthcare context. 

IT: I started a Facebook page www.facebook.com/EndocrineWitch in 2012 as an experiment to see if I could get photos with short captions about health to go viral. I’ve been trying ever since! One particular post on polycystic ovary syndrome which I shared last July 2015 is still active and according to Facebook, has been seen by over 4 million people. I am continuing this Facebook page as my contribution to uplifting health literacy in endocrine disorders. There are after all less than 300 endocrinologists in the Philippines which has a population of 100 million. If you’d like to know more about this, take a look at my TedXDiliman video at https://youtu.be/MQAe_2rLb6M. All my Facebook posts are written in Filipino and archived at http://www.dokbru.endocrine-witch.net.

I co-founded the #HealthXPH tweet chat with Dr. Remo (@bonedoc), Dr. Gia Sison (@giasison) and Dr. Narciso Tapia (@cebumd) in 2014. Weekly, we discuss topics related to the practice of medicine and its intersection with technology and social media. Our format was inspired by the #HCLDR chat. In 2015, we held the first #HealthXPH healthcare and social media summit with the Philippine Council for Health Research and Development. Our plenary speaker was Pat Rich (@pat_health) who came all the way from Canada. This is now an anticipated yearly event attended by medical educators, health bloggers, patients and students from various health professions. 

I began incorporating social media as part of my teaching strategy in graduate school where I teach health informatics in 2012. I subsequently won a teaching award from my university, the University of the Philippines system Gawad Pangulo for Progressive Teaching and Learning in 2015.

You mentioned your first foray into social media was using Facebook as a tool for public health. Had you been familiar with Facebook or any other social media before you used it for this purpose?

IT: I joined Facebook in 2008 because I was organizing a reunion and trying to find my high school classmates. I started my Facebook page in 2012 after seeing grumpy cat. I joined Twitter in 2010 as an assignment in graduate school. I was studying health informatics but going to the US for a week to attend the Endocrine Society meeting. To make up for my absence, my professor asked me to live tweet the conference.

I love that you were an early adopter of live-tweeting medical conferences! Is Twitter one of your favorite platforms – or do you have others?

IT: I enjoy Twitter the most because of the serendipity of meeting like-minded people through retweets and chats. I’ve found mentors on Twitter who have helped me in my professional life. Hosting the #HealthXPH tweet chat is a stimulating intellectual exercise from thinking about the topic, to writing the pre-chat blog post and moderating the discussion.

I find that maintaining my Facebook page has helped me become a better communicator at my clinic. As I write my posts in Filipino and try to avoid medical terms, it is easier now to help my patients understand complex endocrine disorders.

So endocrinology is a topic which obviously interests you. Are there any other topics you are keen to follow through social media. 

IT: I’m interested in the use of social media and technology for healthcare because of my health informatics background. Aside from #HealthXPH, I try to join the #HCLDR chat where I’ve met many of the people I follow. I lurk in diabetes chats listening to persons with diabetes at #DCDE and #DSMA. As a professor in medical school, I’m also interested in medical education. I follow #MedEd, #TEDEdChat and #FOAMEd.

You are a very experienced and expert social media user – what advice would you give to any healthcare professional who is just starting to use social media?

IT: Don’t tweet or post anything that you wouldn’t say in person. Remain professional at all times. #HealthXPH has a manifesto on maintaining medical professionalism while on social media at www.healthxph.net/manifesto.

That’s a very useful guide – thanks for sharing it with us Iris. Finally, would you like to share a favourite quote with us?

Everything you want is on the other side of fear – Jack Canfield

Thanks Iris for taking the time to share with us your experience of using social media in your work. I’ve really enjoyed learning more about how you got started and I look forward to seeing how you and your colleagues will evolve healthcare social media in the Philippines. 


Posted in #HCSM

Social Spotlight: Kristi Bruno

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This week I caught up with Kristi Bruno to find out how social media fits her role as Director of Communications, Media and Marketing, at the American College of Chest Physicians.

Hi Kristi, can you tell us how you are using social media in your work.


KB:
We use social media at the American College of Chest Physicians each day.  We have employed social tools to build a community, share the latest research and news in chest medicine with our membership, educate and inform the public and patients about health topics like COPD, lung cancer and asthma.

We are most proud lately of our work on Reddit. Our Reddit Ask Me Anything was designed to increase awareness of a non-pharmacological treatment of severe asthma called bronchial thermoplasty, to raise awareness of the American College of Chest Physicians, and to position the organization as a thought leader in pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine. We have a couple more AMAs planned this year and we’re thrilled to bring interesting researchers and ideas to this community.

I’m also really excited to continue exploring how our use of Facebook Live can help break down boundaries, bring information to those who might not otherwise get it due to geography or economics. We’ve already started dabbling in Facebook Live in our training center—it’s a great facility and we host courses often and the tool is helping us to tell that story.

Sounds like you are using social media in some creative and innovative ways Kristi. Can you remember back to when you first started using social media? What prompted you to get started with it?

KB: I began my career as a fundraiser and in partnership management for a non-profit. While working for the CHEST Foundation as a Development Manager, I fell into social media. We had a public-facing campaign and I was able to take a tiny budget and make a real impact in reach, engagement and mobilization in a New Year’s contest we were holding. I immediately fell in love and luckily work for an organization that allowed me to take on a new role in our Marketing Communications department so I could further explore my interests. My role continues to evolve at CHEST, but I absolutely have a real love for social and new media.

It’s wonderful that you are able to explore and nurture you passion for social media in your career. That’s awesome. So which platforms do you enjoy the most?

KB: It’s so hard to choose—like picking a favorite child (ha!), but I like them all for different reasons. Professionally, Twitter is amazing. I love that I’m able to connect with like-minded people working in the field, and follow clinicians working in chest medicine to see what they are most interested in—that part really informs my day-to-day work.

For reach—it’s a tool within a platform, but I’m loving the impact of Facebook Live. And, from a branding perspective, we have really enjoyed employing Spotify playlists as a tool for promoting the meeting location each year for our annual meeting. Our team has a great time curating these playlists. And, it’s a nice opportunity to show that our meeting isn’t all about the science! We’ve also used Storify as a tool to engage our subject matter experts in curating interesting content in a specific area. We syndicate these across our platforms. It’s an easy way to engage thought leaders and, again, gives us plenty of ideas as we develop our own content.

I love that idea of using Spotify! What a fun way to showcase your brand’s personality. Now I’m interested to learn more about which healthcare topics interest you. Do you take part in any particular twitter chats?

KB: CHEST holds quarterly Twitter chats with the hashtag #pulmCC. We’ve worked hard to engage different sub-specialties in the chats and we’ve talked about big data in the ICU, palliative care, sarcoidosis—it’s run the gamut. I’m also completely in awe of the lung cancer social media chat, #lcsm. The group behind the chat and Twitter handle are so passionate about what they do. I had the pleasure this year of meeting two of them at CHEST 2016—Deana Hendrickson and Tom Verghese (pictured below).

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They are two really amazing people. Deana lost her mother to lung cancer, and Tom is a thoracic surgeon. I’m just moved beyond belief by them because they have created a real grassroots movement around a highly-stigmatized disease. I’ve learned a ton from this group and continue to learn!

I know both Deana and Tom through Twitter and I too am in awe of the work they are doing. Without social media, I know I would never have met such incredible people. It’s one of the reasons I love social media so much and recommend it to people who work in health care. For those who are just starting to use social media what advice would you give to them?  

KB: Have a plan! There are so many platforms, cool ideas and things you could do. But, be true to your brand, audience and really think things through and don’t get overwhelmed. Develop a strategy and stick to it—but be flexible because the landscape is constantly changing.

And, read. I was lucky enough to go to grad school at DePaul and get my MA in New Media Studies—but before formal education, I consumed as much information as I could about social media, healthcare, health communications, the patient experience, and what clinicians were talking about on social media. This reading and research benefits me almost every day of my life. Always be a student!

Thanks Kristi for taking the time to share with us your experience of using social media in your work. I’ve really enjoyed learning about the creative ways you are leveraging popular social platforms, and I’ve even picked up some new tips from you! 


About Kristi Bruno

Kristi Bruno is Director of Communications, Media and Marketing with the American College of Chest Physicians and a proud alum of DePaul University’s New Media Studies MA program. Kristi was named Folio: Top Women in Media Rising Star and was the 2016 New Media Studies Fellow at DePaul University. She has spoken at Social Media Week Chicago, and has published on the topic of healthcare social media in several notable journals and blogs. She can be found on Twitter (of course), @kristibruno and she blogs at kristibruno.com.

Posted in #HCSM, social spotlight

Social Spotlight: Professor Brian Dolan

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This week it was my great pleasure to catch up with fellow Irish man and global citizen, Brian Dolan.  A director of Health Service 360, Brian has a career that spans more than 30 years working as a nurse and nursing leader with a background in both acute mental health and emergency nursing.

Hi Brian, I am keen to learn more about the role social media plays in your work. Has it led to any exciting projects? 

BD: For some years now I’ve been talking about the last 1,000 days – the time left if you’re an 80-year-old woman whose life expectancy is 83 years or 76-year-old man whose life expectancy is 79 years – and why patient time is the most important currency in healthcare. In July my blog on this topic was published by @FabNHSStuff and curated by the wonderful @PeteGordon68 and @ECISTNetwork. It seems to have taken on a life of its own through twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook and will now the subject of my next book, ‘The Last 1,000 Days’. Thank you social media!

That’s really exciting Brian! So when did you start using social media. What prompted you to get started?

BD: I started using Facebook 7-8 years ago mainly for staying in touch with family and friends, as I work and live in New Zealand and the UK, as well as having extensive travel to Australia. With cousins in California it means I can chat with loved ones up to 19 time zones away!

I think that’s certainly true of many of us – we are led into social media for personal reasons, but then we discover a whole other side to it. Professionally, which platform do you enjoy using the most?

BD:  While Facebook has been wonderful for reconnecting with friends and family from childhood and beyond, I really enjoy Twitter as the single best source of Continuing Professional Development I’ve known in my career. I also love that you can create personal connections with so many eclectic, interesting and generous folk – like yourself Marie! – whom one might not otherwise meet.

I agree! Meeting like-minded people has been one of the most rewarding aspects of social media for me too. Which topics interest you? Do you take part in any particular twitter chats?

BD:  While unsurprisingly nursing is my main interest, quality and service improvement, all things Irish and PhD research are also places I live on twitter. Time zone constraints mean I don’t get to enjoy as many twitter chats as I would like but I like to catch up via their hashtags.

What advice would you give someone just starting out on social media?

BD: Twitter is not just about Kardashians and the waters of healthcare Twitter are warm, kind and generous, so jump right in. Always be your best self on social media and don’t be tempted to feed the trolls!

Great advice! Finally, would you like to share a favourite quote with us?

No matter how educated, talented, rich or cool you believe you are, how you treat people tells everything. Integrity is everything.

Thanks so much Brian for taking the time to share with us your experience of using social media in your work.  It’s been a pleasure to get to know you better through this interview and I look forward to hearing more about your new book when it’s published.


Read: The last 1,000 days: What happens when patient time becomes the most important currency in healthcare #last1000days

Follow Brian on Twitter @BrianwDolan

 

 

Posted in #HCSM, social spotlight

Social Spotlight: Dr Ollie Minton

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This week I am shining my social spotlight on Macmillan consultant, and honorary senior lecturer in palliative medicine at St. George’s University of London, Dr Ollie Minton.

Hi Ollie, I’m eager to learn more about how you are using social media in your work?

OM: As the saying goes no one reads your work except the reviewers and editor so sharing my interests and publications has gone a long way. I also think sharing articles and other things of interest is the best use of social media and by that I mean Twitter. I think some gentle campaigning such as Dying Matters and You Only Die Once (#yodo) pays dividends.

The more you make the connections, the more it pays off

We were able to promote our team at work and the  trust to a huge audience – you can’t buy that publicity – and demystify what we do. The rest is simply serendipity, but the more you make the connections, the more it pays off – I think for instance more of my work has been read since I tweeted links in the last year than ever before. I have enjoyed following and being followed by a wide cross-section of medical types and interest groups.

When did you start using social media. What prompted you to get started?

OM: I started during my PhD in earnest – feeling like a fish out of water – a clinician in the lab and the time any experiment took. I have then seen the proliferation of open data and access and feel that work both old and new can be shared equally. I also wanted to broaden my reading beyond my speciality and medicine to a degree.

Which platform(s) do you enjoy using the most?

OM:  Really for me Twitter offers it all and links take me to wherever I need to go. There is some mythical ratio of professional to personal interactions of either 80:20 or 70:30; and for the most part I think I stick to that. The only recent addition I have made is to write a few blogs – prompted by Twitter friends and m’learned colleague and friend Dr Mark Taubert who is also the associate editor of the BMJ Supportive and Palliative Care blog, so there’s a natural outlet and obviously you can then tweet the link to what you’ve written.

Which topics interest you; do you take part in any particular twitter chats?

OM: I’d hope I took the early lesson from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and hide in plain sight, with my interests, both clinical and academic, made explicit. I am interested in supportive and palliative care very broadly, which can encompass all aspects of health. I would focus on cancer care in particular, and long term effects of successful treatment. I take part in the relevant Twitter chats as a result – palliative medicine and radiation oncology journal clubs when the time difference internationally allow, and I do enjoy the debates in the @WeDocs chats both formal and impromptu.

What advice would you give someone just starting out on social media?

OM: Don’t agonise too much – create a profile that allows a personality to come through – photo and bio obviously straight away and jump in.  As I said we docs are very community focused.

The only decent set of “rules” I ever read were by the UK civil service

It’s not rocket science – we must use common sense about everything we publish on digital and social media. Once something has been sent, it’s public. Following these guidelines correctly will ensure that your social media activity will enhance your job as a civil servant, while also retaining the highest levels of integrity.

Or the ASCO – no one is anonymous online and hide in plain sight.

Finally, would you like to share a favourite quote with us? 

OM: I’d cheat and recommend the 42 Douglas Adams quotes to live by from the recent radio 4 revival. But out of all of them, I’d choose:  ” All opinions are not equal. Some are a very great deal more robust, sophisticated and well supported in logic and argument than others. The secular update of In God We Trust all others must bring data” (attributed to W Edwards Deming).

I really enjoyed learning more about your work and philosophy Ollie. I look forward to learning more from you on Twitter.  Thanks! 

Follow Ollie on Twitter @drol007

 

 

Posted in #HCSM, social spotlight

Social Spotlight: Dr Liam Farrell

facebook_f1fb8088feThis week it’s my great pleasure to shine a spotlight on the work of Dr Liam Farrell, an award-winning writer and broadcaster, an irrepressible humourist, and talented musician, and the founder of #IrishMed – Ireland’s first healthcare tweet chat.

Congratulations Liam on the success of #IrishMed.  Can you tell us what led you to start the tweet chat?

LF: I started the #IrishMed tweetchat over two years ago. I’d been taking part in other tweet chats such as #hcldr and #hcsm, and co-hosted a few, for #hpm and #dwdchat. On one of these (won’t say which, there was only one regular responder, which made it a long sixty minutes, so thanks Kathy Kastner for not leaving me high and dry). I’d found them interesting and stimulating, and then reckoned that we needed a similar chat on this side of the world.

I really like how you’ve brought an international audience together for #IrishMed. Was this your original intention?

LF: Initially I’d expected only Irish tweeps would get involved, but it rapidly grew into a global network, with regular participants from North America, Africa + Asia (we go out at 6 am in the morning in the Philippines, so fair dues to my good friends over there). It goes to show that health issues are universal.  Connecting with people and making friends from all across the globe has been a wonderful experience, all generous with their time and their wisdom, all trying to make the world a better place. #IrishMed is also non-hierarchical; all perspectives are valuable, whether specialist, generalist, patient, advocate, carer or general public, and it all helps to in breaking down the artificial barriers between healthcare professional and patients; after all every HCP (health care professional) will be a patient one day. And the dialogue goes both ways; HCPs learn about patient frustrations, patients can more appreciate the difficulties and limitations of medical care.

When did you start using social media? Were you an early adopter of any one particular platform? 

LF: My son Jack was a volunteer in Ohio for President Obama in 2012, and twitter was a great way of staying in touch with the pulse of the campaign. There is always a danger of twitter becoming an echo chamber, so I deliberately followed tweeps from all sides of the political spectrum. I’m a socialist, but like to think I’m ready to accept a persuasive argument from  a different point of view.

Which platform(s) do you enjoy using the most?

LF: I use Facebook mainly to keep in touch with my family and friends. Facebook was also handy to archive my columns in one place, and I’ve started a wordpress blog recently, as many of my journal columns are subscriber only and I thought they needed the light of day.  Twitter is my favourite platform, it allows rapid exchange of ideas, and at it’s best the format demands thought. The 180 character limit really forces you to make your responses punchy and concise; excessive verbosity is impossible. 

Which topics do you like to follow on social media? Do you take part in any Twitter chats outside of #IrishMed?

LF: “Doctors are the natural attorneys of the poor,” said Virchow. The contribution of medical care to population health is relatively minor; much more important are the social determinants of health #SDoH, sanitation, food, education, housing. The main cause of ill-health is poverty and doctors that don’t take a political stance are reneging on their responsibilities.

I’m particularly interested in palliative care, as in my rural practice we looked after our own patients, and I was also a postgraduate tutor in palliative care. Two thirds of patients die expected deaths, and there is simply no way the palliative care speciality can look after them all. Palliative care must become a generalist skill; often it’s not complicated, and the precious skills of the specialists should be reserved for difficult cases and for education. On a wider scale, educating the general population about death and dying is also critical; it should be a subject taught in schools.

As I write late at night and in the early hours (“What hath night to do with sleep?” Milton), #hcldr and #hscm are always good timing for me. The topics are wide-ranging and the opinions diverse, and I regularly learn something new and have my prejudices challenged. #HeathXPH is on Saturday afternoon, which unfortunately conflicts with watching horse racing. #hcldr was one of the inspirations for #irishmed; the other was the advice of the irreplaceable Marie Ennis O’Connor.

Twitter is such an accessible medium for rapid exchange of information, it’s very under-utilised at the moment; so many other disciplines could get involved. Myself and my maniacally energetic friend Sharon Thompson (@sharontwriter) recently launched #WritersWise – a tweetchat for writers and aspiring writers

I recognise that SoMe is soft power; words are cheap, and as we screen-writers say, “action reveals character.” but you never know when a message will have an effect, and someone, somewhere will be helped because of it.

What advice would you give someone just starting out on social media?

LF: There is so much information out there, it can initially be bewildering. Follow the platforms that suit you best, and read Marie Ennis O’Connor’s blogs.

You’re too kind;-) Methinks the student has surpassed the master these days.

Finally, would you like to share a favourite quote to send us on our way today?

“I’m too busy to be brief;” Samuel Johnson

(One of my favourite quotes – though I think a tad ironic when it comes to Twitter! Ed)

It’s been terrific to learn more about how and why you use social media Liam and I look forward to seeing what new delights you have in store for your faithful following.  


  • Follow Liam on Twitter @drlfarrell
  • #IrishMed takes place every Wednesday at 10 pm Irish time. To learn more and view past transcripts visit www.symplur.com/healthcare-hashtags/irishmed

 

 

Posted in #HCSM

Social Spotlight: Debra Bassett

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This week I interview Debra Bassett, a PhD Candidate at the University of Warwick. Debra’s research explores the creation of digital memories on the Internet and how digital immortality may affect how people grieve.

Hi Debra, I am fascinated by the research you’ve undertaken. Could you tell us some more about it.

DB:  My PhD research is looking at whether digital immortality being offered by the Internet will affect the way people grieve.  As part of this research I am analysing thanablogs (blogs written by terminally ill people).  I am analysing tweets from terminally ill people, and “death bed tweets”.  Facebook is being used by many to create memorial sites and virtual graveyards for people to visit, these also are part of my research.

When did you start using social media. What prompted you to get started?

DB: I have avoided using social media personally for many reasons (I only have 1 Facebook friend as I refuse all requests from people).  However, to do research I have to have Facebook in order to access the Facebook pages of others.

Which platform(s) do you enjoy using the most?

DB: I love using Twitter which I only started using as part of my research.  You were the first person to contact me on Twitter and gently suggested I needed to fill my profile in! I love Twitter!  My research does not sit comfortably within the Sociology department at Warwick, so I am alone in my area of research.  Twitter introduced me to other thanatologists and allows me to discuss my research with others who understand.  It also helps with participant recruitment (I hope).  It also helps you to be extremely concise with your ideas and how you explain them.  The “elevator pitch” but even more concise.

Which topics interest you – eg do you take part in any particular twitter chats?

DB: I like following political conversations, although sometimes I think Twitter creates an echo chamber (e.g. Brexit)

What advice would you give someone just starting out on social media?

DB: Just dive in, others will help and advise at you go along.

Finally, would you like to share a favourite quote with us?

DB: “Tomorrow is another day” Gone with the Wind

If you would like to contribute to Debra’s research, please visit her website debrabassett.co.uk for details on how you can take part. 

Posted in #HCSM

Social Spotlight: Deirdre Munro

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This week I turn the social spotlight on Deirdre Munro,  founder of The Global Village Networks, to find out more about how she uses social media in her work.

Logo created by my son Brian (aged 15)
Logo created by my son Brian (aged 15)

Can you tell us about the The Global Village Networks project you founded?

DM: I would love to share our Global Village of Midwives story with you. Our story began at the International Confederation of Midwifery (ICM) Prague June 2014. I travelled to Prague with a fellow midwife Naomi O’Donovan, kindly sponsored by the Irish Nurses and Midwives Organisation (INMO).  I shared lots of new research on twitter and started to use a hashtag  #Globalvillagemidwives and later due to demand created @GlobalVillageMW

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This led to other global villages being born:
(This list comes under a Twitter Global Village Network)
  • The Global Village of Mental Health
  • Ability Global Village
  • The Global Village of Health Translation
  • Global Village of Nurses

And there are more in utero!

Which social networking platform(s) do you enjoy using the most?

DM: I am a proud member of many many fantastic platforms

    • The Global Village Network of course!
    • World Health Innovation Summit #WHIS
    • World Health Organisation
    • International Confederation Midwives
    • Maternity Experience #matexp
    • School for health Care Radicals #SHCR #EdgeClub
    • #TeamShiny
    • #wemidwives
    • England Centre for Practice Development International Fellows #ECPDF #mindfulofthegap
    • #whywedoresearch
    • @EhealthIreland
    • Council Clinical Information Officers (Ireland)  #CCIO

Too many conferences to mention! It’s a Twitter party out here so come on and join the fun!

Which topics interest you – eg do you take part in any particular twitter chats?

DM: I am passionate about midwifery, healthcare, research, sharing knowledge, designing research, reviewing methodology, innovation, improving health care and systems together, supporting each other and of course social media.

What advice would you give someone just starting out on social media?

DM:  Don’t be nervous. Just set up a Twitter account and start to follow people that inspire you. Find a twitterbuddy and nurture your confidence. Then start to join a conversation. It opened up a new GlobalVillage for me, the innovations and opportunities are endless.

Finally, would you like to share a favourite quote with us?

I am known as a Twitter induced wordsmith so here it goes;
‘Myometrium moment’ is that awe moment when your heart squeezes (and uterus if you’re female!) and hugs your very soul – #myomo
Innovation moment – I know moment #InoMo

That moment when you really need a hug and support … to increase the mood and love hormone oxytocin  #oxyhug

Thanks Deirdre for taking the time to share your passion and enthusiasm for social media with us.


 

 

 

 

Posted in #HCSM

Social Spotlight: James Legan MD

 

This week it’s my great pleasure to catch up with James Legan, MD, an Internal Medicine Physician, now in his 23rd year in Private Practice in Great Falls, Montana, USA.  James blogs regularly about patient care and technology, and was an early adopter of live video streaming platforms Periscope and Blab.  A talented painter, James is also one of the friendliest, kindest and most welcoming persons I have met online.

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Hi James, I know you have a passion for combining technology with patient care, could you begin by sharing an example of how you do this. 

JL:  My passion has been sharing my experience with #ProjectedEHR, an approach that I have been using for the past two and a half years at the point of care with my patients.  I use a wall mounted 24 inch screen in each exam room and as I walk in and greet the patient, hook the 14″ Acer Chromebook via HDMI cord to the large screen.  Instantaneously the patient and I can look at their own data/information contained in their electronic record.  I have had such a positive response with my own patients, I share this approach whenever I can get the chance.

When did you start using social media. What prompted you to get started?

JL:  About 2 years ago I started with Twitter, which has been the “nest” for my Social Media Platform with links to my Periscope, Blab and WordPress sites. Desiring to share #ProjectedEHR as a way to give back to the Profession, with the intention of hopefully helping others in the medical arena is what got me started.

Which platform(s) do you enjoy using the most?

JL:  I think all the platforms are a bit different and reach different followers, some merge, some separate.  I like to blog for disseminating things learned along the way. I like Periscope to share fun things primarily, mostly on the weekends.  Blab is a great way to brainstorm in small groups, and the next best thing to being together IRL (in real life) and better because of the connections world wide.  So I like all of the platforms and don’t have any particular favorite, just mix it up depending on how I want to connect and with whom.

Which topics interest you – eg do you take part in any particular twitter chats?

JL:  I particularly like topics regarding technology and patient engagement, and #HealthXPH, #HITsm #IrishMed and #HCLDR are twitter chats I have been most involved with

What advice would you give someone just starting out on social media?

JL:  Don’t share anything you would not if printed on the front of your local newspaper, and have fun.  Read Marie Ennis-O’Connor’s rules of social media, and don’t break them. 😉

Finally, would you like to share a favourite quote with us?

JL:  “Listen to your patient, he is telling you the diagnosis,” from Sir William Osler.

Thanks James for taking the time to share with us your experience of using social media in your work. Your commitment to patient care shines through in everything you do. 

Follow James on Twitter @jimmie_vanagon