Posted in #HCSM

What’s New in Social Media This Week?

My latest healthcare social media newsletter has gone out to subscribers. In this week’s round-up of news and tips:

Facebook Page Reach Declined 20% in 2017

unnamed

According to new research by BuzzSumo, the average number of engagements with Facebook posts created by brands and publishers has fallen by more than 20% since January 2017. This report will hardly come as surprising news to those of us who have been despairing at the fall in organic reach on Facebook over the past few years. What I found most interesting in this report is the data on which posts are driving engagement – or not.

WhatsApp Is Testing Verified Business Accounts

unnamed (4)WhatsApp is now testing verified business accounts, which can be identified by their green check marks. The Facebook-owned messaging application said in a frequently asked questions post that the test “is currently limited to a small number of businesses participating in a pilot program.”

Google Announces Major Update To Mobile Search Results Page

Google has announced a major update to its mobile search results pages. Whenever your query brings up a video, Google will now show you a silent six-second clip to help you decide if it’s actually a video you want to see.

 

Twitter Adds Team Management Feature on Tweedeck’s Mobile App

 

unnamed (5).png

Multiple Twitter users can now share access to a single account via the social network’s iOS and Android applications without needing to share that account’s password.

Plus

Your weekly cool tool recommendation, social media quote of the week, and six things you should know in the world of social media.

Read this week’s newsletter and subscribe for regular tips. 

Posted in #HCSM

How Gens X, Y and Z Consume Video Content

People around the world are now watching a billion hours of YouTube’s content every single day.  But who is watching what? This infographic from Adweek helpfully breaks down how much Gens X, Y and Z watches video content on YouTube, as well as what types of videos they like to watch.

Unsurprisingly, younger respondents to the survey were more likely to visit YouTube on a daily basis, while 4  percent of Gen X (34 and 54-years-old) respondents indicated they don’t use the platform at all.

download.png

When it comes to the type of video most watched by each generation, the breakdown  is as follows:

download.png

Whichever demographic you’re looking to market to, YouTube is a valuable channel. For maximum impact, use these findings to understand just how your target age group interacts with the video-sharing platform.

Related Reading: YouTube: A Missed Opportunity For Patient Education 

Posted in #HCSM

Why (And How) You Should Create Recurring Content on Your Blog

Do you have a recurring content feature on your blog? If not, it’s something I’d recommend you consider as a regular element of your editorial calendar.

Recurring content form hooks which keep readers interested in coming back to your blog or seeking similarly related posts.  From a writer’s point of view, it can enhance your creativity – choosing a topic in advance triggers your brain to come up with new ideas and make connections.

instagram_bb3392b931

I’ve experimented over the years with many different types of regular recurring columns on various blogs.  I’ve focused recently on a Cool Tool feature which I post each Monday morning.

Before you introduce a regular feature to readers, it’s important to take some time to choose a topic which matches your content strategy and crucially won’t have you running out of ideas after a few weeks.  Ideally, your topic should be associated with your keyword phrases to support your organic search efforts.

Once you’ve decided on your topic, decide on the elements you will use to maintain consistency in the design and format of your content.  Choose the same day and time to publish so readers know to expect it at that time each week – this helps build an audience for your content.  Keep the format and design elements consistent.

Here are three types of recurring features to add to your content marketing.

  1. Advice Column

Set aside one day a week to provide step-by-step instructions, or answer readers’ questions.  A great example is Moz’s Rand Fiskin’s Whiteboard Friday.

  1. Interview Series

I ran an interview series, Social Spotlight, last year with healthcare thought leaders.  It followed a consistent question format, with some tailoring to the interviewee, and was a popular addition to my content calendar.

  1. Weekly Round-Up Post

I run several weekly round-up style posts for client blogs focussed on their niche. I curate the most helpful, interesting and topical news from their industry and publish them in a blog post, usually on a Friday.  It’s always the most read content when I check the weekly blog stats.

Of course your recurring content can live outside the written word. With the popularity of video, consider adding a regular vlog or even more popular, a Facebook Live recurring feature. For a super example of this, check out social media marketer, Amanda Webb who goes live on Facebook each Friday morning with a round-up of the latest social media news.

Recurring posts of high value keeps your audience interested and coming back for more. By adding a regular recurring feature to your content marketing you give your audience something to look forward, while at the same time building a unique and recognisable element into your brand.

Do you have a recurring content feature on your blog? What are some of your favourite examples of recurring content themes?

Posted in #HCSM

A Three-Stage Approach to Handling a Healthcare Social Media Crisis

Knowing how to maintain an online reputation is an essential component of healthcare marketing. In this blog post, I will show you how to put an effective crisis response strategy in place for your healthcare brand.

Having an online presence has so many advantages when it comes to healthcare marketing, but it also comes with some risks. With the click of a mouse, patients can share their experiences online – good and bad – and their comments travel at lightening-speed through their social network. A social media crisis can escalate rapidly and you must be ready to step in and remedy the situation without delay. The only way to do this is to have a crisis plan already in place.

Crisis management involves dealing with threats before, during, and after they have occurred. Let’s look at these three stages in more detail.

 

crisis plan
Image: HCSMMonitor

Stage 1 Preparation

Proactively prepare by developing a crisis response plan. The following elements are involved.

#1 Crisis Definition

First, define what constitutes a crisis. Three elements are common to a crisis (a) a threat to the organization, (b) the element of surprise, and (c) a short decision time.

A crisis can fall into several categories including:

(a) Technological (eg; your website has been hacked);

(b) Confrontation (disgruntled employee, client, or patient attacks you online);

(c) Rumours (eg; spreading false information about you, your product or service online);

(d) Malevolence (eg; In 1982, a murderer added cyanide to some Tylenol capsules on store shelves, killing seven people).

#2 Monitor Online Chatter

An effective social media strategy requires active listening to the online chatter about your healthcare organization. Should a crisis occur, listening to the conversation will help you shape a more insightful and effective response. Responding in real time to issues strengthens public perception that your focus is firmly on patient satisfaction. In addition, use monitoring to find the healthcare conversations you can add value to. Investing in community building online now will pay dividends in the form of support should a crisis hit you.

There are many free and paid monitoring tools available to you. These tools vary in scope and range across a number of sites, real-time or delayed searching, the sophistication of analytics, the flexibility of data presentation, integration with other applications, and of course, price. When it comes to reputation management, choose a tool that does more than just track mentions of your name. You need to be able to evaluate the sentiment (the ratio of mentions that are positive to those that are negative) attached to the mentions. Social Mention is a free monitoring tool which includes sentiment. Tweets that include words like “not working,” “fail” or “poor experience” should be resolved immediately.

#3 Create a Written Plan

Your written plan should include the following:

  • Clear guidelines on how to respond to each of the different situations outlined above in #1.
  • Links to your terms of service.
  • Who should respond – establish a clear chain of command and list contact information.
  • Make sure every member of your team knows this plan is in place, how to access it, and how to put the plan into action.

Stage 2:  Action

Now’s the time to put your carefully crafted crisis plan into place. The following are key considerations:

  • Determine the exact nature of the crisis. How and where did it originate? How is it affecting your patients or clients?
  • Go to the source. Find where the complaint originated and with whom. Determine their sphere of influence. If a blogger has published something that is untrue or misrepresentative of you, ask them to remove, amend, or modify the piece if this is appropriate.
  • Be respectful, polite and engaged. Never get into a public argument or talk down to anyone.
  • Be as transparent as possible as quickly as possible. Acknowledge that you are aware of the situation and that you are dealing with it straight away.
  • Respond swiftly and appropriately. Every moment counts on social media. The longer you wait, the more the conversation will heat up. Twitter, in particular, is a place where people expect a quick response no matter what time of day.
  • Don’t  lie or try to hide the truth; admit when the fault is yours.
  • Use the same channel you were criticized on to respond.
  • Don’t censor or remove the critical comments that appear on your social media platforms. Tempting as this may appear, it will only fan the flames of the social media fire.
  • Channel communication to your own website. Develop an area on your website or blog that houses the information about the crisis and what your organization is doing about it.
  • Communicate your story. A story gets out of control when you haven’t told your side and people begin to speculate. While you can’t control the story, you can provide the facts, information, and access to key people that allow journalists and bloggers to help you frame it in the right way.

Stage 3: Review

When the crisis has passed, go over what happened. Ask yourself the following questions:

  • How well did you handle the situation?
  • Did it escalate to a bigger problem than it was?
  • What could you have done differently?
  • Prepare to deliver on your word. Make changes based on feedback if those changes are warranted and if you have promised to put them in place.

If handled well a crisis may even turn out to be an opportunity to show your commitment to your patients and consumers. Remember the Tylenol example above? Johnson & Johnson recalled and destroyed 31 million capsules at a cost of $100 million. The CEO appeared in television ads and at news conferences informing consumers of the company’s actions. Tamper-resistant packaging was quickly introduced, and Tylenol sales bounced back to near pre-crisis levels.

While you can’t control everything that happens on social media, you can control your response. The best way to handle a crisis is to have your response plan in place. If you haven’t already made one, then do it today.

Related Reading

Posted in #HCSM

50 Power Words To Super Charge Your Content Marketing

 

Did you know that on average, 8 out of 10 people will read headline copy, but only 2 out of 10 will read the rest? Your headline is the first impression you make on a prospective reader. An eye-catching headline is a key factor in getting readers to click through to your article.

An attention-getting headline will capture the reader’s attention right away and compel them to want to find out more. Clear, concise, and original content is important, but words that appeal to their emotions is the magic ingredient to giving your visitors a reason to want to diver deeper.
Business2Community

Trigger words can entice readers to your content, but use these words with caution because they can also trigger skepticism and distrust. Make sure your content carries through on the promise in the headline and always avoid click-baiting.  Clickbait headlines typically aim to exploit the “curiosity gap”, providing just enough information to make the reader curious, but not enough to satisfy their curiosity without clicking through to the linked content. Always craft a headline that links to authentic and relevant content.

For a deep dive into which words and phrases drive the most shares and engagement, Buzzsumo analyzed 100 million article headlines and reported their findings here.

Further Related Reading

 

Posted in #HCSM

What’s New in Social Media This Week?

My latest healthcare social media newsletter has gone out to subscribers. In this week’s round-up of news and tips:

unnamed (34).jpg

August already! If you are like me, you will feel as if you just blinked and suddenly the year is more than half over. Back in January, I wrote an article outlining 17 ways to rock your social media in 2017. Did you follow any of those tips?

Now that we are more than half way through this year, it seems like a good time to review how close you are getting to meeting your social media goals. If you are on track, well done! But even if you have fallen short of your goals, it’s never too late to get your social media back on track. As a reminder, I have put together six questions to guide you.

unnamed (4)

 

Pinterest has been adding some new features recently, and the latest worth noting is the addition of a new search bar to its home screen and Pinterest Lens is now available to all Pinterest users worldwide.

 

 

 

unnamed (35)LinkedIn is giving more control to publishers – you can now turn off comments on your posts, helping users eliminate spam and harassment from the social network.

 

unnamed (5)

 

 

Within a year of its debut, Instagram Stories now boasts “more than 250 million daily users,” which surpasses Snapchat’s reported 166 million daily users.

 

unnamed (6)Facebook is redesigning insights and analytics provided to video creators and to the publishers and pages that reshare their videos.

Plus

Your weekly cool tool recommendation, social media quote of the week, and six things you should know in the world of social media.

Read this week’s newsletter and subscribe for regular tips. 

Posted in #HCSM, LinkedIn

LinkedIn Website Demographics: Understand the Professional Audiences Visiting Your Website

LinkedIn has announced the roll-out of LinkedIn Website Demographics, “a free reporting tool that lets you see what types of professionals are coming to your website, giving you a powerful way to tune your marketing to those visitors, and develop better targeting and content for your campaigns.”

Website Demographics uses data from LinkedIn’s 500+ million members to provide insight into your company’s website visitors in a way that respects member privacy. Featuring an easy-to-read interface in LinkedIn Campaign Manager, Website Demographics lets you filter your website audience by 8 individual professional dimensions, including job title, industry, job seniority, job function, company, location, and country.

Website Demographics also allows you to filter by date range to understand whether that recent marketing campaign boosted traffic from your desired audience segments. What’s more, you can now see if you have attracted new pools of prospects to your website. With these insights, you can craft new marketing content designed to better resonate with that audience.

This new feature will begin rolling out soon, so watch this space.

Posted in #HCSM, Infographics

Data Never Sleeps: Here’s What Happens Every Minute on the Internet

I never cease to be blown away by the sheer scale and acceleration of the Internet. The world is more connected than ever before. From 2000-2017 global Internet users jumped from 400 million to 3.7 billion. But just how much data is generated every minute? This fascinating infographic from Domo shows exactly how much data is created every single minute. From tweets to swipes, likes to shares, the digital world is exploding.

17_domo_data-never-sleeps-5-01.png