Posted in #HCSM, Thursday Tip

#ThursdayTip: How To Create Facebook Collections With Saved Content

Welcome to this week’s social media tip. Today I want you to show you how to use Facebook Collections to curate and organize saved content for easy access and sharing.

Ever come across a piece of content on Facebook but don’t have time to read it in the moment? Did you know you can save that content to view later?  Facebook lets you save content (posts, events, pages, and photos) directly from your news feed and then easily access your saved items from the left navigation menu on the home page.

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Here’s how to do it.

To save content to your saved item list, simply click the three dots at the top right of any Facebook post in your news feed, and then simply select the option to save the content.

download - 2019-12-05T082106.892 When you start building a group of saved posts, you can start to organize it into collections, categorizing it by topic.

To create a collection, simply click on Create Collection in the left sidebar.  You’ll then be prompted to name your collection.

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If you want to add a saved post to a collection, simply click the Add to Collection button below the item in your saved list – or create a new collection.

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You can also share a saved item directly from your list by clicking the Share button.

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I find the ability to save content on Facebook and categorize it according to collections a very useful feature.  I like to share a #MondayMotivation quote each week and many times scrolling through Facebook I’ll find the perfect quote to save. Come Monday all I have to do is access my folder containing quotes to share one quickly and easily with my followers.

Here’s to your social media success!

Posted in #HCSM

A Literature Review of Social Media Use by Health Care Providers

A recently published literature review aims to shed light on social media use worldwide and to discuss how it has been used as an essential tool in the health care industry from the perspective of healthcare professionals.

A literature review conducted between March and April 2020 is the latest most up to date reviews of the uses of social media in healthcare, including the use of social media during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Based on 158 studies, conducted in the United States (61), Canada (12), Brazil (2), the United Kingdom (12), Europe (22), the Middle East (9), India (9), Asia (8), and Australia (7), most of the reviewed articles were published over the past decade.

The findings presented in this review have implications for health care professionals, educators, and researchers.

Key Findings

As of August 4, 2020, 27,546 results appeared when searching for social media on PubMed, demonstrating the growing interest in SM within the health care industry.

Social media (SM) brings a new dimension to health care and is changing the nature and speed of health-related interactions between individuals and health organizations.

Healthcare professionals (HCPs)and health organizations should capitalize on the opportunities provided by SM and update strategies to reach communities and age cohorts at a relatively low cost.

Advantages of using SM in health care include accessibility from a smartphone, prompt content sharing and response generation, two-way communication,ability to forge connections between people, ability to reach large masses regardless of geographic location, age, or education, compared with traditional communication methods.

The most influential advantage of SM remains its cost-benefit feature: it can reach an increasing number of people without the high cost of traditional means and the information remains available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

In health care, SM tools can be used for different purposes (health promotion; dissemination of health information; education; professional development; recruitment; communication with the public, colleagues, and patients; and research) and in diverse medical specialties (cardiology, nursing, radiology, dentistry, surgery, pathology, pediatrics, pharmacy, emergency, and critical and palliative care).

Using SM could be a key strategy in addressing some of the challenges and limitations often faced by HCPs in traditional health communication through faster and cheaper dissemination, more accessibility, better interaction, and increased patient empowerment.

Those who choose to use SM should be aware of the potential risks and problems that they could encounter but should not shy away from using SM because it can greatly increase the reach and impact of HCPs’ work and improve patients’ health.

Access the full paper: Farsi D.Social Media and Health Care, Part I: Literature Review of Social Media Use by Health Care Providers J Med Internet Res 2021;23(4):e23205

You might also like to read:

What’s the Influence of Patients’ Internet Health Information-Seeking Behaviour on the Patient-Physician Relationship?

Posted in #HCSM, Twitter

How To Use Twitter Analytics: A Simple Step-By-Step Guide For Healthcare Communicators

Twitter analytics is a simple but effective insights tool to help you analyse your Twitter activity.

It’s still surprising to me how many people who are using Twitter for marketing and communications have never checked this inbuilt analytics tool.

You can navigate to the platform either by visiting https://analytics.twitter.com/about or accessing it directly from your Twitter account under the More tab (on the desktop version).

From the Home tab, you get a summary of your account activity for the past 28 days. This includes your tweets, tweet impressions, profile visits, mentions, and follower count.

Scroll down on your account home page to view highlights of your account activity over the past few months, such as top tweets, top followers, and top mentions.

By clicking into Tweet Activity you can get a more granular view of how people engaged with a particular tweet.

Scroll back up to the Tweets tab at the top of the page to view your tweet activity. 

The first thing you will see is a snapshot of the number of Impressions your tweets got over the past 28 days.

Twitter Impressions is simply when a tweet appears on someone’s timeline. It’s important to note that this doesn’t necessarily mean a person engaged with your tweet, but it does give you a sense of how many people your tweets has the potential to reach.

From the screenshot above you will also see you have the option of changing the date range – the default is the last 28 days. You can choose to view the last 7 days or any of the previous 5 months. You also have an option to specify a specific date range.

To the right of the date range selection, you’ll also see the option to Export Data. Clicking on this tab gives you the option to download “by tweet” or “by day” via a .csv file which can be imported to an excel spread sheet – great for reporting.

Now let’s take a closer look at the kind of data we can see on this page. Your tweets are analyzed according to Top Tweets, Tweets and Replies, Promoted Tweets (if you are advertising on Twitter), Impressions, Engagement and Engagement Rate.

We’ve already look at Impressions earlier, so now let’s turn to Engagements. An engagement is an interaction with a tweet ( e.g. likes and retweets. The engagement rate of a tweet is the number of engagements it gets divided by its number of impressions. This is a key metric to track over time.

You can also get a graphic representation of your engagement rate as you can see in the image below.

Looking into your Twitter data in this way is useful to show you how your content is performing on the platform. It gives you insight into the best days to post and which types of content people most like to engage with. If you run a campaign, it’s essential that you track the campaign from the start right through to the end. Keeping a close eye on the data will allow you to to adjust your campaign as you go.

Use the insights you gather from Twitter analytics to inform your social strategy, optimize your content, grow your following and boost your engagement.

To learn more visit the Twitter Analytics page.

You might also like to read the following articles:

Become a Social Media Ninja With These 25 Smart Twitter Hacks

7 Data-Backed Tips To Drive More Engagement on Twitter

Posted in #HCSM, Thursday Tip

#ThursdayTip: How to Follow Topics on Twitter

Welcome to this week’s quick social media tip. This week I want to show you how to follow topics on Twitter. Following a Topic allows you to stay informed on what’s happening and see more relevant content about that topic.

Here’s how to follow topics on Twitter

From your Home timeline

  1. While scrolling through your Home timeline, you may notice that Twitter will suggest a Topic for you to follow.
  2. Simply Tap the Follow button next to the suggested Topic to follow.

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From your Topics menu

Tap Topics in your profile icon menu.

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Tap Follow some Topics to browse by category type.

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From within each category and sub-category type, tap the Follow button next to the Topics you’d like to follow.

When finished, tap Done.

Note:  Just like with accounts you follow, you can unfollow Topics at any time.

How to unfollow a Topic

From your Home timeline:

  1. In your Home timeline, navigate to a Tweet about a Topic you’re currently following.
  2.  Tap the  icon from the top of the Tweet and select Unfollow.

From your Topics: 

  1. Tap Topics in your profile icon menu.
  2. Tap Unfollow next to the topic.

Worth Noting

Topics you follow are public.

Anyone who can see your full profile can view the Topics you follow. If your Tweets are protected, only your followers will be able to see your Topics.

How to see the Topics someone follows

You have the option to see the Topics that someone else is following. You’re able to view their Topics if their Tweets are public, or if their Tweets are protected and you’ve been approved as a follower.

On the Twitter for iOS and Android app, and twitter.com:

  1. Go to their profile.
  2. Click or tap the more menu  at the top of their profile page.
  3. Select View Topics.

Here’s to your Twitter success!

Posted in #HCSM

What Healthcare Marketers Should Know About Instagram in 2021

Are you using Instagram for your healthcare communication?

Instagram (IG) enables healthcare providers the opportunity to connect in an immediate way with their patients. It is particularly good for community outreach activities and patient education.  Healthcare providers can also use IG to show users a behind-the-scenes view of their practice.

Dermatologists, cosmetic dentists, and plastic surgeons can benefit from Instagram by using photos or video to illustrate their services. Practices can showcase before and after photos of patients, as well as videos or illustrations that educate patients on procedures and treatments.

A new infographic summarises some key facts and figures about Instagram which will be of interest whether you are already using the platform or wondering if it’s a place you should be in 2021.

Since its launch in 2010 Instagram has grown to over 1 billion active monthly users, sharing 95 million posts every day.

And Instagram users aren’t just active — they’re highly engaged. More than 200 million users spend an average of 53 minutes per day on Instagram and visit at least one business profile.

So how does Instagram stack up against popular platforms such as Facebook and Twitter?

Turns out it has higher engagement rates than both. In general, Instagram has an average engagement rate that is 14x higher than that of Facebook. Compared to Twitter, the rate is even 27x as high. 

Is this the best place for you to engage your audience?

The most active age demographic is 18-34 so if your target audience falls into this bracket, then Instagram is definitely the place for you to communicate.

Want to learn more?

Check out this presentation which I gave at the Social Media Residency Clinic during Mayo Clinic’s Middle Eastern Summit.

Posted in #HCSM

Write Better Headlines With These 9 Winning Formulas

“The purpose of a title is to get potential readers to read the first line of your content.” – David Ogilvy

David Ogilvy, the original Mad Man of advertising, once famously said, “On the average, five times as many people read the headline as read the body copy. When you have written your headline, you have spent eighty cents out of your dollar.”

Ogilvy’s remark reminds us never to underestimate the power of the humble headline.

Even in this digital age, headlines count.

Think about how many headlines you read every day while searching online or browsing social media. What makes you actually click on an article or post to read it?

Quite often it’s the headline.

According to Copyblogger, on average, 8 out of 10 people will read headline copy, but only 2 out of 10 will read the rest.

Your headline is the first (perhaps only) impression you make on a prospective reader.

And yet many content creators treat their titles as an afterthought. The good news is that writing captivating headlines is a skill you can learn and hone to perfection.

Over the years, I have developed some tried and tested formulas for writing headlines which compel readers to click and read more.

In this post, you will learn nine secrets to writing great headlines that work every time.

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There’s no absolute rule on how long your title should be, but try not to make it any longer than it needs to be.

As a rough guide aim for 6-10 words or 50-60 characters.  It’s worth remembering that when the length of your headline exceeds 62 characters, search engines ignore the remainder of the headline (which may decrease your click-through rate).

CoSchedule has some good information on optimal headline length here: What Really Is the Best Headline Length?

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People love number-style articles. Our brains are attracted to numbers because they automatically organize information into a logical order.

Several research studies have shown that headlines with numbers tend to generate 73% more social shares and engagement (interestingly, research shows that headlines that contain odd numbers have a higher click-through rate than headlines with even numbers).

When adding numbers to your title, use the numeral, not the word. Web users scan headlines and using a numeral makes your title more scannable.

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Question headlines have two benefits. Firstly, they leverage a reader’s curiosity.   Secondly, a question headline boosts your SEO efforts.

Increasingly, people are using voice search on their smartphones, tablets or voice assistants (like the Amazon Echo or Google Home devices) to search for information on the Internet. It’s estimated that by 2020, 50% percent of all searches will likely be voice searches. In essence, voice searches are largely about answering questions, not about focusing on individual keywords.

Question headlines help future-proof your content for SEO. To quote NewsCred, “If you’re a marketer, ‘What’s the Alexa strategy?’ will be a question you’ll be expected to answer.”

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It’s important to include keywords in your titles if you want to rank higher for particular search terms. Adding them at the start of your headline can have a greater SEO-impact than if you include them at the end of a title.

When researching keywords I like to turn to Google Related Searches. You’ve probably noticed that Google displays related search results at the bottom of the first page when you type in your Google search query. This is a helpful resource as it returns ideas that are relevant to your topic based on user interest and contextual words.

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Personalizing your title by adding a “You” or “Yours” makes your headline more effective since it speaks to your readers’ concerns and sounds more conversational. It’s important to use the words and language your audience actually uses. If you’re not sure what that language is, use social media as a listening tool to find out.

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All great headlines are benefit-driven. David Ogilvy said that the headlines which work best are those that promise the reader a benefit. Keep the benefit upfront and specific in your title. Will your readers learn something new? Are you offering actionable steps for them to take?

Including words like tips, ways, strategies, etc. in your headline promises your readers that they will know more and do more after they have read your post. Be sure you deliver on that promise. Ask yourself: “As a reader, what would I expect to read if I clicked through to this post?”

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Research by CoSchedule found that content with emotional value gets shared significantly more than content that contains little emotional value. Emotion is a key driver for making people click and share your content, with positive emotions driving more clicks and shares than negative or neutral content.

If you want to test this theory for yourself, plug your headline into the Advanced Marketing Institute’s Emotional Marketing Value (EMV) Headline Analyzer. This tool scores the EMV of your headline with a breakdown of why it scored that value. A perfect score would be 100%, but don’t despair if yours doesn’t match up. According to the Institute, “most professional copywriters’ headlines will have 30%-40% EMV Words in their headlines, while the most gifted copywriters will have 50%-75% EMV words in headlines.”

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All words are not created equal. Although I’m no fan of hyped-up phrases, the judicious use of power words in your headline will grab a reader’s attention fast.

Try reading the title of this post, omitting the adjective “Winning”, and it’s not quite so compelling. The key here is to make sure the choice of word is justified. Don’t say your solution is “easy” if it clearly involves a lot of work. Download a list of 90 headline power words here.

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By nature we are curious beings, so leverage that curiosity in your titles. Learn from the masters of the headline craft, Buzzfeed and Upworthy. A word of caution here—when using this formula, never resort to click-baiting. Always craft a headline that links to authentic and relevant content.

Over to you

Test out the suggestions in this post next time you sit down to write a piece of content. There is no excuse to settle for a “good enough” headline. Keep a swipe file handy for inspiration, adding to it every time you see a great headline. The more you practice, the more skilled you will become as a headline writer.

Do let me know what your favorite headline formula is. Which headlines work best for your audience? Share your best tips with readers in the comments below.


This post first published  Mayo Clinic Social Media Network

Posted in #HCSM

#ThursdayTip: How To Pin A Tweet

Welcome to this week’s social media tip.

Pinning a Tweet allows you to showcase your best content at the top of your profile page for as long as you’d like.

In the past Twitter typically only allowed viewers to see posts in a sequential timeline which meant that your most important or relevant content quickly got lost in the fast-moving Twitter stream.

To solve this issue Twitter now allows you to pin a tweet or keep it placed at the top of the newsfeed giving you more editorial control as to what a viewer will see first when visiting your page.

How To Pin A Tweet

It’s super quick and easy to do. Follow the steps below to pin your first tweet.

1. Open up your Twitter Profile Page.

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2. Choose a Tweet you would like to Pin. Select “Pin to your profile page”.

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3. The Tweet will now automatically appear at the top of Page.

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4. To remove a pinned tweet, simply click on the “unpin” option. 

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It’s a good idea to review your pinned tweets regularly to make sure you are sharing up-to-date posts. Out-dated pins will make your profile look out-dated too.  To refresh your Twitter profile simply choose another tweet to pin. Twitter will ask you to confirm if you want to replace your current pinned tweet.

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It couldn’t be easier to follow these steps and it’s something you should certainly do to highlight your accomplishments, share your latest news, and bring your viewers attention to the posts you want them to see first.

Here’s to your tweeting success!

Posted in #HCSM

How Does The Facebook News Feed Predict What You See?

At the start of 2018, Facebook announced major changes to the Facebook news feed which means that firstly, people will see fewer posts from Pages and more from personal connections.

What this essentially means, is that Facebook will prioritize content that engages users in their Newsfeed.

But how exactly does the Facebook algorithm determine what to show you? This short video from Facebook explains in simple terms how it decides what you will see when you log in to the platform.

Want to learn more?

Check out my Medium article 7 Ways To Increase Organic Reach and Create Engaging Content on Facebook.

Posted in #HCSM, Thursday Tip

#ThursdayTip: How To Use Twitter’s Conversation Settings

Welcome to this week’s quick social media tip.

Today I want you to show you how to use Twitter’s Tweet Reply conversation setting. 

Last August Twitter rolled out this function to users to give people more control over the conversations they start.

Sometimes people are more comfortable talking about what’s happening when they can choose who can reply. Users in the test pool have said that they feel more comfortable tweeting, and more protected from spam and abuse, which has lead to them tweeting longer, more in-depth thoughts, particularly on sensitive subjects.

Here’s how it works

Before you Tweet, choose who can reply with three options:

  1. Everyone (the default, standard setting)
  2. Only people you follow
  3. Only people you mention

 

Tweets with the latter two settings will be labeled and the reply icon will be grayed out for people who can’t reply. People who can’t reply will still be able to view, Retweet, Retweet with Comment, share, and like these Tweets.

I admit I haven’t used the feature, but it’s interesting to see how some brands are utilising it here.

How about you? Do you think this is a useful feature?

Posted in #HCSM

How To Handle a Healthcare Social Media Crisis

Knowing how to maintain an online reputation is an essential component of healthcare marketing. In this blog post, I will show you how to put an effective crisis response strategy in place for your healthcare brand.

Having an online presence has so many advantages when it comes to healthcare marketing, but it also comes with some risks. With the click of a mouse, patients can share their experiences online – good and bad – and their comments travel at lightening-speed through their social network. A social media crisis can escalate rapidly and you must be ready to step in and remedy the situation without delay. The only way to do this is to have a crisis plan already in place.

Crisis management involves dealing with threats before, during, and after they have occurred. Let’s look at these three stages in more detail.

crisis plan
Image: HCSMMonitor

Stage 1 Preparation

Proactively prepare by developing a crisis response plan. The following elements are involved.

#1 Crisis Definition

First, define what constitutes a crisis. Three elements are common to a crisis (a) a threat to the organization, (b) the element of surprise, and (c) a short decision time.

A crisis can fall into several categories including:

(a) Technological (eg; your website has been hacked);

(b) Confrontation (disgruntled employee, client, or patient attacks you online);

(c) Rumours (eg; spreading false information about you, your product or service online);

(d) Malevolence (eg; In 1982, a murderer added cyanide to some Tylenol capsules on store shelves, killing seven people).

#2 Monitor Online Chatter

An effective social media strategy requires active listening to the online chatter about your healthcare organization. Should a crisis occur, listening to the conversation will help you shape a more insightful and effective response. Responding in real time to issues strengthens public perception that your focus is firmly on patient satisfaction. In addition, use monitoring to find the healthcare conversations you can add value to. Investing in community building online now will pay dividends in the form of support should a crisis hit you.

There are many free and paid monitoring tools available to you. These tools vary in scope and range across a number of sites, real-time or delayed searching, the sophistication of analytics, the flexibility of data presentation, integration with other applications, and of course, price. When it comes to reputation management, choose a tool that does more than just track mentions of your name. You need to be able to evaluate the sentiment (the ratio of mentions that are positive to those that are negative) attached to the mentions. Mention is a freemium monitoring tool that includes sentiment. Tweets that include words like “not working,” “fail” or “poor experience” should be resolved immediately.

#3 Create a Written Plan

Your written plan should include the following:

  • Clear guidelines on how to respond to each of the different situations outlined above in #1.
  • Links to your terms of service.
  • Who should respond – establish a clear chain of command and list contact information.
  • Make sure every member of your team knows this plan is in place, how to access it, and how to put the plan into action.

Stage 2:  Action

Now’s the time to put your carefully crafted crisis plan into place. The following are key considerations:

  • Determine the exact nature of the crisis. How and where did it originate? How is it affecting your patients or clients?
  • Go to the source. Find where the complaint originated and with whom. Determine their sphere of influence. If a blogger has published something that is untrue or misrepresentative of you, ask them to remove, amend, or modify the piece if this is appropriate.
  • Be respectful, polite and engaged. Never get into a public argument or talk down to anyone.
  • Be as transparent as possible as quickly as possible. Acknowledge that you are aware of the situation and that you are dealing with it straight away.
  • Respond swiftly and appropriately. Every moment counts on social media. The longer you wait, the more the conversation will heat up. Twitter, in particular, is a place where people expect a quick response no matter what time of day.
  • Don’t lie or try to hide the truth; admit when the fault is yours.
  • Use the same channel on which you were criticized to respond.
  • Don’t censor or remove the critical comments that appear on your social media platforms. Tempting as this may appear, it will only fan the flames of the social media fire.
  • Channel communication to your own website. Develop an area on your website or blog that houses the information about the crisis and what your organization is doing about it.
  • Communicate your story. A story gets out of control when you haven’t told your side and people begin to speculate. While you can’t control the story, you can provide the facts, information, and access to key people that allow journalists and bloggers to help you frame it in the right way.

Stage 3: Review

When the crisis has passed, go over what happened. Ask yourself the following questions:

  • How well did you handle the situation?
  • Did it escalate to a bigger problem than it was?
  • What could you have done differently?
  • Prepare to deliver on your word. Make changes based on feedback if those changes are warranted and if you have promised to put them in place.

If handled well a crisis may even turn out to be an opportunity to show your commitment to your patients and consumers. Remember the Tylenol example above? Johnson & Johnson recalled and destroyed 31 million capsules at a cost of $100 million. The CEO appeared in television ads and at news conferences informing consumers of the company’s actions. Tamper-resistant packaging was quickly introduced, and Tylenol sales bounced back to near pre-crisis levels.

While you can’t control everything that happens on social media, you can control your response. The best way to handle a crisis is to have your response plan in place. If you haven’t already made one, then do it today.

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