Posted in #HCSM, Facebook

Facebook Introduces New Tools For Advertisers

Facebook has introduced two new tools aimed at helping advertisers to reach people who are more likely to take valuable actions towards your business objectives.

The first, value optimization, enables advertisers to optimize their ad campaigns based on purchase value data passed through the Facebook pixel. Value optimization works by using the purchase values sent from the Facebook pixel to estimate how much a person may spend with your business over a seven-day period. The ad’s bid is then automatically adjusted based on this estimation, allowing campaigns to deliver ads to people likely to spend more with your business at a low cost. Value optimization will roll out to eligible businesses over the next few months. Businesses can access value optimization when they create website conversion ad sets that are optimizing for purchases in Ads Manager.

The second, value-based Lookalike Audiences, allows you to include a value column in your customer list, which you can then use to reach new people that look like your highest spending customers. Facebook introduced Lookalike Audiences over four years ago to help marketers reach people likely to be interested in a business based on people who have visited their site or customers added from a Custom Audience.

As Facebook explains:

While Lookalikes are a powerful tool to help grow a customer base, businesses often want to grow specific cohorts of their audience based on the value to their business. In order to provide a more effective solution to do this, we are rolling out value-based Lookalikes globally. With this enhancement, advertisers are no longer limited to creating small groups of audiences based on their spend or LTV prior to creating a Custom Audience. Now, they can include a value column to their entire customer list, which Facebook can use to create an additional weighted signal for people most likely to make a purchase after seeing your ad. Value-based lookalikes can be found across all objectives in Ads Manager or Business Manager.

And advertisers on Facebook will soon have more control over where their ads appear, as Facebook is rolling out several tools aimed at providing more transparency before campaigns go live.  The latest updates will provide advertisers with a list of publishers up front to show where ads might appear via Instant Articles, in-stream ads within Facebook and across the Facebook Audience Network.  This will help provide more transparency for advertisers before campaigns instead of only after. While the tools are now in beta they’ll be rolled out over the course of this year.

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Posted in #HCSM

What’s New in Social Media This Week?

My latest healthcare social media newsletter has gone out to subscribers. In this week’s round-up of news and tips:

  • 10 Steps To A Winning Content Strategy

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Creating great content begins with having a clear purpose in mind. Check out my ten step process to get there.

  • Mary Meeker’s 2017 Internet Trends Report

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Each year, Mary Meeker, partner at the Silicon Valley venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, releases a report, described by Tech Crunch as “essentially the state of the union for the technology industry”. Read more about the report in this week’s newsletter.

  • Snapchat Rolls Out New Web Tool To Create On-Demand Geofilter

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Snapchat has introduced a redesigned web tool to make it easier for users to create on-demand geofilters from scratch. Find more details in this week’s newsletter.

  • Instagram Rolls Out Location Stories and Hashtag Stories

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Instagram is rolling out two new features to show you what’s happening around you and find stories related to your interests. More information in this week’s newsletter.

Plus

Your weekly cool tool recommendation, social media quote of the week, and six things you should know in the world of social media.

Read this week’s newsletter and subscribe for regular tips. 

Posted in #HCSM

Snapchat 101: What Brands Need to Know [Infographic]

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What does the rise of Snapchat mean for brands? How big is Snapchat’s audience? Is it only for Millennials?

If you’ve been wondering what the answers to these questions are, and how you might use Snapchat in your marketing, then take a look at this new infographic created by MDG Advertising, which outlines some key usage data for Snapchat, along with notes on how brands are using the platform to best effect.

Let’s start by looking at the stats. 150 million people use Snapshat every day, with 400 million snaps sent daily. That’s a bigger daily active user base than Twitter!  Snapchat grew as much in one year as Twitter has in 4 years combined. The app is expected to add twice as many users as Twitter and Pinterest in the next year.

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So what’s the audience demographic? Is it skewed towards Millennials? Right now Snapchat is used most by those aged 25 and under, but adoption by an older demographic is growing.

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Have brands jumped on the Snapchat phenomenon? Interestingly not. The number of brands who say they are currently using the app as part of their marketing strategy is only 5%. This represents a unique opportunity for your brand to be an early adopter and lead the way on the platform.

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Of those brands who have ventured onto the platform, how are they using it?

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So finally, the big question. Is Snapchat right for your brand? If you want to connect with a younger audience, yes, you should probably be engaging on the platform. Otherwise, the advice is to wait and see. Keep an eye on what other brands are doing and start formulating a strategy for when you judge the time is right to jump on board.

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Have you started using Snapchat for your marketing yet? What ways are you using it to engage with your audience?  Or what might be holding you back from establishing a presence there?

Related Reading:

Posted in #HCSM, Twitter

12 Ways To Search For Health-Related Content On Twitter

Twitter’s statistics are mind-blowing. According to Internet Live Stats, every second, on average, around 6,000 tweets are tweeted on Twitter which corresponds to over 350,000 tweets sent per minute, 500 million tweets per day and around 200 billion tweets per year! So, how do you keep up with all those tweets? Obviously it’s impossible to keep up, but you can handle the avalanche better through a combination of maintaining Twitter lists of the people you follow, health-related hashtags, etc., and using Twitter’s Advanced Search Engine.

While the easiest way to do a search on Twitter is to click the native search facility, you can do so much more with Twitter’s advanced search capabilities. It allows you to narrow down your search using parameters such as specific keywords, language, people, location, and date range. In today’s post, I will show you twelve ways you can use this powerful search engine to search for health-related content on Twitter.

1. Search for a phrase: for example “healthcare social media marketing strategy”.

2. Search for any of these words: for example “healthcare social media” or “healthcare marketing strategy”.

3. Exclude any word: for example “blog”.

4. Search for health related hashtags: for example #hcsm.

5. Search for any specific language.

6. Choose specific accounts to search within.

7. Or find tweets directed to a specified Twitter user or referencing a specific username.

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8. Search for tweets in a specific location or within a specified mile radius of a location.

9. Narrow down your tweets within a specific date range. This is useful if you want to catch up on tweets around a specific conference or event.

10. Discover sentiment around tweets – i.e. whether negative or positive.

11. Find health-related questions. This feature enables you to search for conversations happening locally that you might like to add your expertise to.

12. Choose to include re-tweets in your search. I usually exclude this search parameter, as I prefer to concentrate on original tweets; however it may be useful if you want to see how many times a tweet has been re-tweeted or who is re-tweeting specific tweets.

And here’s a snapshot of my final search results. As you can, I can zoom in on the most popular tweets, or those who are tweeting in real time. I cans also find photos and videos related to my search. I can even save this search, and embed it on my website.

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Considering its capabilities, it is surprising that Twitter’s advanced search engine is so underused. Try using it to create lists, curate content, and as a social media listening tool to find health-related conversations. Once you start, you are sure to find other ways to maximise this powerful search engine to advance your healthcare marketing.

Posted in #HCSM

How To Increase Social Shares With “Click To Tweet”

Click to Tweet is a cool free tool which generates one-click tweet boxes or links that can be shared through your website, your blog, or via email. It’s a powerful way to increase social shares and highlight quotes, stats, and key takeaways for your content marketing.

Here’s a good example of how it looks on a blog.click2tweeteg.png

And here’s how to do it for your own blog or website.

Step One: Sign in with your Twitter account.

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Step Two: Write the message that you want others to share in the box provided.

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Step Three: Click the “Generate New Link” button to create a custom link.

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Step Four: Share the link and track the activity of each link over time.

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Whoever clicks on the link will have the message automatically added to their Twitter status box- they simply click to tweet.

Try it now and see for yourself!

 

 

Posted in #HCSM

The Role of Social Media in Clinical Trial Recruitment

Last week I was delighted to present at the National Lipid Association’s Scientific Meeting in Philadelphia on the topic of social media and its role in clinical trial recruitment. You can view my slides below.

I also had the honor of chairing a social media panel with Dr Martha Gulati and Dr Katey Rayner.

It was a super experience and as I pointed out in my talk, I would never have imagined myself speaking to these clinicians, nurses, and researchers, if it wasn’t for Twitter. It still gives me a thrill to think how far a tweet can take you. It was by meeting Dr James Underberg, President of the National Lipid Association on Twitter that I found myself on my way from Ireland to Philadelphia for this meeting. So never underestimate those connections you make online – you just never know how far they may take you!

Posted in #HCSM, Video

Are Stories The New Social Media Newsfeed?

The social channels we use are less important now than ever before. Today, it’s all about how you tell your story.

Convince and Convert recently created a short video which explores the idea that stories are becoming the new newsfeed of social media. It’s less about what social network you use to reach your audience. What is important today is how you tell a story.

Snapchat changed the game when it evolved from a messaging app to a storytelling platform. Now stories are integrated as part of Instagram, Facebook, Facebook Messenger, and WhatsApp. Stories are becoming the new newsfeed of social media, and you can’t avoid stories because your customers aren’t using Snapchat. So when we think about how to make content for social media, we need to be thinking in stories, and not in posts.

The presenter shares three elements essential to producing good stories:

  1. Use vertical video
  2. Create a chronological narrative sequence
  3. Add overlays such as text, filters, stickers, and emoji

Key Takeaways

  • Carefully choosing your social channels no longer has the impact it once had on your marketing success.
  • Many of the new feature roll-outs on top social platforms have focused on storytelling.
  • Forget about reaching your daily quota of posts, and focus more on the stories you share.

Related Reading

Posted in #HCSM, Twitter

Can A Hashtag Change Healthcare? The Impact of Healthcare Tweet Chats

tweet-follow1Can A Hashtag Change Healthcare?  

The first time I read this quote from Dana Lewis, moderator of #hcsm the premier tweet chat on healthcare, I was gripped by the notion of how Twitter and in particular tweet chats could influence the way we practise healthcare.

Social media is a radical shift in the way we communicate. The healthcare conversation is no longer a one-way narrative but is evolving into a global, participatory discussion. One of the most powerful ways I see this happening is in the modality of the tweet chat. The role Twitter plays in breaking down patient/provider barriers, disseminating and expanding the reach of healthcare information, widening social networks and co-creating a collaborative model of shared health information is one of the most exciting developments in social media.

What Is A Tweet Chat?

For those who may be unfamiliar with the phenomenon of a tweet chat – it is a pre-arranged chat that happens on Twitter through the use of updates called tweets. It includes a predefined #hashtag which links the tweets together in a virtual conversation. Most tweet chats follow a common format of a moderator who introduces pre-arranged topics relevant to the chat and keeps the conversation on track. The chats usually last one hour and a transcript of tweets is available after the chat has ended.

Symplur is doing an impressive job of compiling all of the healthcare hashtags and providing chat transcripts in The Healthcare Hashtag Project. The goal of the project is to make the use of healthcare social media and Twitter more accessible for the healthcare community as a whole (a full list and a tweet chat calendar of meeting times can be found on the Symplur website).

What Is The Impact Of Tweet Chats On Healthcare?

As a relatively new technological innovation, the use of Twitter as a modality for health communication is only now beginning to be explored with particular emphasis on the role Twitter may play in contributing to health based conversations directed at individual, community, and societal levels.

Many times, people’s choices in terms of Personal Health Practices (PHP) are context dependent and socially constructed. Healthcare tweet chats have tremendous potential to motivate participants and encourage change. Much of this change comes from peer-to-peer support which has been shown to be highly effective in motivating change. Many participants share conversational and informational knowledge that they believe is valuable both to themselves and others.

Tweet from participant in the #BCCEU (Breast Cancer Social Media Europe) tweet chat
Tweet from participant in the #BCCEU (Breast Cancer Social Media Europe) tweet chat

Studies show that individuals enrolled in meaningful social networks have protective properties in terms of overall health and wellbeing. Healthcare tweet chats provide participants with a sense of community and valuable opportunities for meaningful exchange and positive interactions.

The impact of digital technology in healthcare is leading to changing expectations by health consumers who, along with a desire to share information and connect with others, increasingly want to interact and engage with their healthcare providers. Twitter has also facilitated the emergence of  the “patient opinion leader” an individual who is seen as an expert in chronic conditions such as cancer.  Gunther Eysenbach refers to this group as “Apomediaries” – individuals that assist in the process of information searching but do not act as a gatekeeper.

So, what’s in it for healthcare practitioners?

Dr Bryan Vartabedian (@Doctor_V) of Baylor College notes of social media “the greatest value of this medium is the breakdown of barriers that have traditionally come between doctor and patient.” It is encouraging to see the increasing participation by doctors in many healthcare tweet chats, reaching out and sharing information, but also listening too.

Twitter offers opportunities for healthcare to reach out to patients in new and valuable ways.

These [social media] tools help us reach so many more people; we can bring shared interactions into our practice and that is powerful … This isn’t an addition to your job. This is part of your job.  This is a conversation, and that is what we are trained to do … This is where our patients are these days and this is where we need to reach them. We can engage learners, patients and peers, and we are not limited by geography or time – Farris Timimi, M.D., medical director for the Mayo Clinic Center for Social  Media.

Another striking feature is Twitter’s crowd-sourcing capacity which allows health consumers, researchers and practitioners tap into a global source of advice, support and information. Twitter also provides a unique opportunity to learn from patients’ direct experience shared during these chats.

If healthcare innovators and providers wish to remain relevant and connected to digitally enabled patients, they need to go where the conversations are – more and more those conversations are happening on Twitter and the evolving dynamic of the tweet chat is the best place to find them.

Reference

Eysenbach, G. (2008). Medicine 2.0: Social networking, collaboration, participation, apomediation, and openness. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 10(3), e22. doi:10.2196/jmir.1030

Posted in #HCSM

Need a topic for your healthcare blog? Here are 16 ideas to get you going

Healthcare blogs vary in content and style; they range from commentary on a topical issue to patients sharing the lived experience of a disease and healthcare professionals educating patients on the management of an illness.

Blogs written by doctors, nurses, health researchers, patients, and healthcare and digital marketers and innovators add much to the richness and diversity of the online healthcare conversation. Creating a blog is relatively easy; the challenge lies in consistently updating the content. If you are struggling to come up with new ideas on a regular basis for your blog, then this list of 16 content ideas should help get you going again.

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What kind of questions do your patients most frequently ask about a specific medical condition? Compile a list of these frequently asked questions and answer them on your blog.

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Creating original content is time and resource intensive.  Curation helps you provide your audience with relevant, high quality information on a regular basis without sacrificing your time and resources. Don’t rely on curation alone; curated content is designed to complement your content creation plan—not replace it.

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Are you rolling out a new program, product or service? Write a blog post to introduce it and highlight its features and benefits.

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Healthcare is constantly changing and evolving. Can you predict or comment on the latest healthcare trend? Readers will enjoy learning about it through your blog, particularly if you share your own unique perspective. Set up Google Alerts to keep updated on emerging trends in your industry to provide the latest information for your readers.

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There are several online tools you can use to create a readers’ poll. If you have a WordPress.com site, then you’ve got Polldaddy polls already built in. You can create, manage, and see results for all of your polls directly in your WordPress.com dashboard. If you use a WordPress.org install on your self-hosted site, install the Polldaddy WordPress.org plugin. Use it to get a snapshot of readers’ attitudes to health topics like vaccination, screening, complementary therapy, mental health – the list is endless. Publish a follow-on post with your findings.

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Write about a typical day in your working life as a healthcare professional. Be careful not to write about specific patients or to commit any breaches of privacy or confidentiality.

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Use an editorial calendar to track seasonal, cultural and industry events and write a blog post which fits the theme, for example, “How To Eat Healthily During The Holiday Season”.  Check out Twitter’s #ownthemoment tool for inspiration.

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Have you been to a conference recently where you learned about new medical research? Or read about the latest research in a medical journal?  Let your readers know about it through your blog. Make sure you provide full references and link to online publications.

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A screencast is a video screen capture with audio narration. Create a screencast to demonstrate a how-to tutorial for your patients.

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Whether you are running an event, speaking, or exhibiting at it, use your blog to build pre-event interest. Can you offer readers a special code for purchasing tickets at a reduced rate via your blog?

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After a speaking event, embed a slidedeck of your presentation on your blog using SlideShare.

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Ask a colleague to write a guest blog on an area of their expertise.

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Choose a respected healthcare professional and interview them for your blog. Alternatively, contact several experts in your field and have them answer a question: Take all the answers and turn them into one big blog post.

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Provide your unique perspective on a trending topic. Find out what’s “hot right now” online by using Google Trends, Twitter.com/Search and Reddit.com.

twitter_8e7a678b95.jpgMix things up by recording a podcast relevant to your blog’s themes.

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Gather the week’s healthcare news into a round-up post. Provide links, attribute sources and add your own commentary.

Over To You!

Have you any other suggestions you can add to this list?

Related Reading

Posted in #HCSM

Why (And How) You Should Create Recurring Content on Your Blog

Do you have a recurring content feature on your blog? If not, it’s something I’d recommend you consider as a regular element of your editorial calendar.

Recurring content form hooks which keep readers interested in coming back to your blog or seeking similarly related posts.  From a writer’s point of view it can enhance your creativity – choosing a topic in advance triggers your brain to come up with new ideas and make connections.

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I’ve experimented over the years with many different types of regular recurring columns on various blogs.  I’ve focused recently on a Cool Tool feature which I post each Monday morning.

Before you introduce a regular feature to readers, it’s important to take some time to choose a topic which matches your content strategy and crucially won’t have you running out of ideas after a few weeks.  Ideally your topic should be associated with your keyword phrases to support your organic search efforts.

Once you’ve decided on your topic, decide on the elements you will use to maintain consistency in the design and format of your content.  Choose the same day and time to publish so readers know to expect it at that time each week – this helps build an audience for your content.  Keep the format and design elements consistent.

Here are three types of recurring features to add to your content marketing.

  1. Advice Column

Set aside one day a week to provide step-by-step instructions, or answer readers’ questions.  A great example is Moz’s Rand Fiskin’s Whiteboard Friday.

  1. Interview Series

I ran an interview series, Social Spotlight, last year with healthcare thought leaders.  It followed a consistent question format, with some tailoring to the interviewee, and was a popular addition to my content calendar.

  1. Weekly Round-Up Post

I run several weekly round-up style posts for client blogs focussed on their niche. I curate the most helpful, interesting and topical news from their industry and publish them in a blog post, usually on a Friday.  It’s always the most read content when I check the weekly blog stats.

Of course your recurring content can live outside the written word. With the popularity of video, consider adding a regular vlog or even more popular, a Facebook Live recurring feature. For a super example of this, check out social media marketer, Amanda Webb who goes live on Facebook each Friday morning with a round-up of the latest social media news.

Recurring posts of high value keeps your audience interested and coming back for more. By adding a regular recurring feature to your content marketing you give your audience something to look forward, while at the same time building a unique and recognisable element into your brand.

Do you have a recurring content feature on your blog? What are some of your favourite examples of recurring content themes?