Posted in #HCSM, Thursday Tip

#ThursdayTip: How To Create Facebook Collections With Saved Content

Welcome to this week’s social media tip. Today I want you to show you how to use Facebook Collections to curate and organize saved content for easy access and sharing.

Ever come across a piece of content on Facebook but don’t have time to read it in the moment? Did you know you can save that content to view later?  Facebook lets you save content (posts, events, pages, and photos) directly from your news feed and then easily access your saved items from the left navigation menu on the home page.

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Here’s how to do it.

To save content to your saved item list, simply click the three dots at the top right of any Facebook post in your news feed, and then simply select the option to save the content.

download - 2019-12-05T082106.892 When you start building a group of saved posts, you can start to organize it into collections, categorizing it by topic.

To create a collection, simply click on Create Collection in the left sidebar.  You’ll then be prompted to name your collection.

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If you want to add a saved post to a collection, simply click the Add to Collection button below the item in your saved list – or create a new collection.

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You can also share a saved item directly from your list by clicking the Share button.

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I find the ability to save content on Facebook and categorize it according to collections a very useful feature.  I like to share a #MondayMotivation quote each week and many times scrolling through Facebook I’ll find the perfect quote to save. Come Monday all I have to do is access my folder containing quotes to share one quickly and easily with my followers.

Here’s to your social media success!

Posted in Cool Tool

Monday Morning Cool Tool: Repost

I love learning about new tools to make social media marketing more creative and effective, so I’ve decided to share some of my favourite tools with you at the start of each week. This week I’m recommending  Reposta simple tool that makes it easy to Repost your photos and videos on Instagram while giving credit to the original Instagramer.

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When you find something you want to repost in Instagram, simply copy the share URL and open Repost. Then in Repost, you can position the attribution mark and send the reposted media back to Instagram.

 

 

 

Posted in #HCSM

Tweeting The Meeting: 6 Tips on Live-Reporting From Conferences and Events

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I’m excited to be on the Mayo Clinic teaching faculty for the first Middle East Healthcare Social Media Summit in Dubai next week. I’ll be teaching on the Social Media Residency Clinic which takes place a day before the conference and also delivering a talk on the role of hashtags in healthcare on day two of the conference.

Did you know that the very first Twitter hashtag was prompted by a conference?

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So it should come as no surprise that hashtags are super useful for disseminating knowledge presented at conferences. As part of my talk, I will highlight some best practice tips for tweeting the meeting – which I will also share for you here.

1. Tag Your Tweets with the Event Hashtag

Pretty self-explanatory but be sure to use the designated event hashtag which should be displayed by the organizers. If you are organizing the event, keep an eye on unofficial hashtags. Sometimes, people tweet using hashtags that make sense to them instead of using the official hashtag. This shouldn’t be an issue if you have chosen a simple, intuitive hashtag and promoted it in advance, but it is still a good idea to an eye out for rogue hashtags and direct the users to the official one.

Let your Twitter followers know the meaning of the hashtag and why you are tweeting from the conference so that people have some context to what you’re tweeting about. It is good practice to let your followers know in advance that you are live-tweeting so they can mute the hashtag if they aren’t interested in those tweets.

2. Focus on Value

The true aim of live-tweeting is to provide value to others, so avoid tweeting sound-bites that won’t make sense to online listeners. Be selective about the quotes or insights you choose to tweet and only post high-quality photos and videos that your followers will find interesting. No one wants to see a blurry photo of a speaker or a slide.

Strive for originality and context and make it relatable to your Twitter followers.  Tweet links to websites, studies, or other information which will enhance understanding of the topic. It’s fine to highlight your own expertise, but don’t spam. Retweet attendees and speakers who represent your mission and core values. Search for questions being asked using the event hashtag which you can answer.

3. Don’t “Binge Tweet”

Be selective, share key points only and avoid flooding your timeline with tweets. Don’t mindlessly re-tweet what everyone else is already tweeting, unless you can add a unique perspective. When live-Tweeting, one Tweet every five minutes is a good rule of thumb.

4. Give Correct Attribution

Be sure to attribute quotes to the speaker who made them, by using quotation marks. Whenever you cite a speaker, add their Twitter handle and affiliation if known (this is where those pre-prepared Twitter lists come in useful). Separate your own comments/viewpoints from the speaker’s own words.

5. Encourage Engagement

Don’t tweet in a vacuum; engage with fellow live tweeters and contribute to a larger conversation. Involve online listeners by asking questions; e.g. “Speaker X says doctors need to be more empathetic – do you agree/what do you think about this?”

6. Be Social

Finally, don’t restrict yourself to tweeting behind a screen; take the opportunity to network and meet new people face-to-face too. Live-tweeting is a great way to meet like-minded people, so use it to organize “tweetups” at coffee and lunch breaks during the event to further the connection.

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Bonus Tip

After the event has finished, you can still add value by using a tool like Twitter Moments to archive tweets.  You could also summarise the event in a follow-up blog, embedding selected tweets to illustrate your points.

You might also like to read

 Why You Should Live-Tweet Your Next Conference 

How To Add A Search Stream To Twitter

Posted in #HCSM

Ten Social Media Tools I’m Thankful For

In keeping with this week’s Thanksgiving theme, I want to share with you ten tools I use all the time which helps me manage my social media better. I’m thankful to the developers who made these useful tools free and easy to use!

1. Adobe Spark

A free suite of apps that allow both web and mobile users to create and share visual content — like posts for social media, graphics, web stories, and animated videos. One of my go-to graphic tools (the featured image on this post was created using this tool).

2. BeFunky

There is so much you can do with this tool to enhance your visual marketing assets, including creating collages, adding “one-click” photo effects (there are over 300 photo effects and filters to choose from) and an array of graphics (eg speech bubbles). The basic account is free to use and provides users with access to a library of 125 digital effects.

3. Canva

Whether you want a Twitter post or Facebook profile picture, you can create them quickly using Canva’s drag and drop editor. Select from a number of pre-set designs, or create something from scratch. You can also add elements such as custom icons, fonts, charts, and illustrations.

4. Emotional Marketing Value (EMV) Headline Analyzer

This headline analyzer is a free tool from the Advanced Marketing Institute that you can use to calculate the EMV of your own headlines. It scores the EMV of your headline with a breakdown of why it scored that value.

5. Grammarly

A free writing app available as a Google Chrome Extension. Adding Grammarly to Chrome means that your spelling and grammar will be vetted everywhere you write on the web. I use it all the time and find it super useful.

6. Hemingway Editor

A proofreading tool that clears your copy of all unnecessary copy. Just paste your text into the editor and you’ll get an analysis that highlights lengthy, complex sentences, adverbs, passive voice, and common errors.

7. IFTTT

IFTTT (an acronym for If This, Then That) allows you to sync up multiple apps so that when a certain activity happens, it kicks off a separate activity in another app.

8. Lumen5

This is a cool tool that enables you to turn your blog posts into slideshow-type videos in minutes. The free plan includes unlimited videos, access to 10 million video files, and 480p-quality video with the Lumen5 watermark. You can also upload your own logo. Upgrading to the Pro plan ($49/month) lets you remove the Lumen5 branding, upload your own watermark and outro, and more.

9. Pablo

This tool from Buffer is a bare-bones online image editor that lets you make basic social media images in seconds.

10. Scoop.It

A super content curation platform that allows you to easily find and share unique, relevant content to your social networks, website or blog. The free version will allow you to monitor a single topic and use the content generated on up to two social media accounts.

Looking for more tools like these?

Head on over to Medium for100 Tools To Help You Do More With Social Media.

Posted in #HCSM

5 Content Marketing Lessons I Learned From A Simple Thanksgiving Tradition

Although I live outside the US, Thanksgiving’s one of those holidays I celebrate in spirit, if not in person. I’m always curious to learn more about Thanksgiving traditions and being a foodie I’m fascinated by what people eat at the dinner table.

While I still can’t get my head around that sweet potato and marshmallow combo, a green bean casserole is something I might be tempted to try. If you live in the US I guess you already know the story of how this dish came to be a Thanksgiving dinner staple, but for those who aren’t familiar, it’s such a great marketing story with lessons for all of us who want to improve our content marketing.

The casserole originated over 60 years ago in the test kitchen at Campbell’s Soup, where Dorcas Reilly worked as a home economist. Dorcas invented a Green Bean Casserole recipe in response to a question from the Associated Press: “What’s a good Thanksgiving side dish that uses ingredients found in most American kitchens?”

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First demo kitchen, Campbell’s, 1941

The dish Dorcas invented went viral. Millions of Americans made the casserole that year. And today, over 60 years later, it’ll be served on an estimated 30 million Thanksgiving tables across the US, earning its place as one of the most beloved recipes in America.

So what lessons can this simple recipe teach us as content marketers? Over on LinkedIn, I share six valuable lessons we can learn from Dorcas’s green bean casserole.

Click here to read

Posted in Infographics

How To Handle Comments On Social Media [Infographic]

Salesforce do super infographics – here’s one on handling different types of comments on social media. 

First up, a flow-chart for dealing with positive, negative or neutral comments.

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Source: Jeff Bullas

Positive and neutral comments are easily dealt with, but negative comments require a considered approach. If it’s a genuine complaint, acknowledge the complaint, but move it to private communication as quickly as possible.

Trolls are more challenging.  Received wisdom is don’t feed the trolls. Ignore them, but do not attract their attention further by deleting their comment – this only fuels their fire. However, it’s perfectly ok to remove offensive or spam comments, and comments with legal or criminal implications  should be reported to  the relevant authorities.

Finally, some general advice. You should  always personalise your interactions online. Reach out to and engage with your followers regularly.

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Related

How Should You Handle Trolls On Social Media?

Posted in Cool Tool

Monday Morning Cool Tool: Twchat

I love learning about new tools to make social media marketing more creative and effective, so I’ve decided to share some of my favourite tools with you at the start of each week. This week I’m recommending  Twitter chat manager – Twchat.

For those who may be unfamiliar with Twitter chats, they are a public chat, moderated by a host that happens live on Twitter. To filter all the conversations a specific hashtag is used. This hashtag allows you to follow the discussion and participate in it.  Most Twitter chats are recurring and focus on specific topics introduced by a moderator.  The chats usually last one hour and a transcript of tweets is often made available after the chat has ended.

Twitter chats move fast, which is why using a third-party tool is useful. Twchat allows you to create realtime chat rooms based on twitter hashtag.  TwChat monitors the hashtag and creates a simple, clean interface similar to a chatroom. You can see new messages, send your own, and have total control over the content you see.

For more information on Twitter chats, read How Does A Health Care Twitter Chat Work? #Twitter101

 

 

Posted in #HCSM

Do Online Health Seekers Trust Social Media?

A survey profiling how American adults access, use and feel about health-related information finds that most Americans who regularly seek health information are concerned about incorrect or misleading medical information on social media, and few have found health information on social media to be accurate.

These findings are consistent across generations. The survey, The Great American Search for Healthcare Information, was conducted among 1,700 Americans 18 years of age and older. It was commissioned by global communications and marketing services firm Weber Shandwick in partnership with KRC Research.

I find the results of this survey very interesting for a number of reasons. 

Firstly, it’s interesting to learn that the majority of online health seekers are concerned about incorrect or misleading medical information. This reassures me in a way because it means that, contrary to the pervasive belief that the public believes everything they read online, people are actually far more discerning.

It also underscores for me that patients aren’t looking to supplant knowledge from healthcare professionals with the information they find online. They still look to their healthcare providers as the source of credible health information.

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Note that nurses, pharmacists, and eye doctors score higher than medical doctors in terms of satisfaction. This finding surprised me. The survey suggests that physicians may have a millennial problem.

The Millennial generation is least likely to be very satisfied with the information provided by medical doctors. In evaluating other attitudes toward physicians, the study suggests that doctors may be contending with a Millennial trust challenge. In addition to their lower satisfaction levels with information from doctors (on a basis relative to other generations), Millennials are the least likely generation to say they always listen to their doctor(s), the most likely to believe that online health-related information is as reliable as that from medical professionals and the most likely to say they trust their peers more than medical professionals.

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Secondly, I find it disheartening that survey respondents are not finding accurate health information online. We know for a fact that accurate health information does exist online, so why are people not rating it higher?  Medical information websites fall just below average in terms of satisfaction (39 percent).

Finally, I’m a little surprised to learn that concerns about the accuracy of social health information are consistent across generations, including digital natives.

Gen Z, is just as likely to be concerned about incorrect or misleading information as the much older Boomer generation (91 percent and 87 percent, respectively). This suggests that social media comfort and proficiency do not have a bearing on perceptions of legitimacy, leading to the conclusion that it is the content or channel that is the challenge for health-related information communicators.

All of this adds up to a trust and credibility problem we need to urgently address.

A Wake-up Call for Healthcare Professionals

The healthcare industry is still lagging behind in delivering credible and relevant information to patients when and where they need it most.  Healthcare has much to learn from other industries that are adept at mapping the customer journey and providing relevant and timely information at each stage of the journey.

Earning Trust From Online Health Information Seekers

Within each problem lies its solution. To address the trust gap, the authors suggest the following fixes:

Prove your online credibility from the outset

  • information should be cited by a medical professional
  • it should cite a scientific study
  • it should be associated with a trusted brand
  • it should be cited by a trusted school or research organization

Design your content for discovery

By building content that is discoverable across multiple channels – online and offline – you can intersect your customers across their journey and ensure that they find the credible information they’re looking for.

Use succinct, clear and plain language in your communications.

Recognise that people are swimming in information and overwhelmed by the volume, creating confusion and perceptions of conflicting facts.

I would add to this list that it’s important to talk to patients in your offices about the information they find online. For more on this read What’s the Influence of Patients’ Internet Health Information-Seeking Behaviour on the Patient-Physician Relationship?

A Wake-up Call for Healthcare Professionals

In a post published in Physician’s Weekly, primary care physician Mikhail Varshavski, DO, is unequivocal that healthcare professionals’ failure to influence social media is responsible for the rise of misinformation online.

I used to consider the absence of quality physicians online merely a problem of missed opportunity. Now I’ve realized it is much more than that. If misinformation has the power to call in to question the validity of something as grand as an American presidential election, it certainly has the power to influence our patients’ everyday health decisions. The healthcare industry as a whole needs to advocate for more education and focus on this burgeoning global communication platform.


According to a 2017 survey by PM360 Online, only 9% of physicians engage with patients and other health care providers — this includes physicians who reply to comments, join group discussions or share helpful information and links on social media platforms – and as low as 1% of all health care professionals use social media to be content creators — publishing original content via blogs, forums, and websites.

Click here for the full The Great American Search for Healthcare Information report and presentation. It includes additional findings such as the types of health information Americans seek, their use of new digital health services and apps and attitudes about the concerns vs. advantages of the state of healthcare information today.


You might also like to read 

Protecting the Value of Medical Science in the Age of Social Media and “Fake News”

An Opportunity To Build Patient Loyalty In An Era Of Social Media And Fake News

Posted in #HCSM, Thursday Tip

#ThursdayTip: How To Save Searches on Twitter

Welcome to this week’s social media tip. Today I want you to show you how to save searches on Twitter.

1. Go to the Search tab 

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2. Enter your search into the search box.

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3. At the top of your results page, tap the three dots icon  and then tap Save. 

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4.Next time you tap the search box, a pop-up menu will display your Saved searches.

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5. To remove a search: Tap on delete saved search.ad759305-df08-40b2-a190-eea658880b6b

 Note: You may have up to 25 saved searches per account.

 

 

Posted in Cool Tool

Monday Morning Cool Tool: Venngage

I love learning about new tools to make social media marketing more creative and effective, so I’ve decided to share some of my favourite tools with you at the start of each week. This week I’m recommending a free infographic maker  – Venngage.

You can choose from 100+ infographic templates and follow the steps below to create your own infographics.

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Research suggests that publishers who use infographics grow in traffic 12 percent more than those who don’t. They can also be a fun way to promote brand awareness. In terms of social media marketing, they are an effective way of spreading information (the “viral” process) across multiple social networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and blogs.

Click here to learn how to create your own healthcare infographic.