Posted in #HCSM, Twitter

How To Use Twitter Analytics: A Simple Step-By-Step Guide For Healthcare Communicators

Twitter analytics is a simple but effective insights tool to help you analyse your Twitter activity.

It’s still surprising to me how many people who are using Twitter for marketing and communications have never checked this inbuilt analytics tool.

You can navigate to the platform either by visiting https://analytics.twitter.com/about or accessing it directly from your Twitter account under the More tab (on the desktop version).

From the Home tab, you get a summary of your account activity for the past 28 days. This includes your tweets, tweet impressions, profile visits, mentions, and follower count.

Scroll down on your account home page to view highlights of your account activity over the past few months, such as top tweets, top followers, and top mentions.

By clicking into Tweet Activity you can get a more granular view of how people engaged with a particular tweet.

Scroll back up to the Tweets tab at the top of the page to view your tweet activity. 

The first thing you will see is a snapshot of the number of Impressions your tweets got over the past 28 days.

Twitter Impressions is simply when a tweet appears on someone’s timeline. It’s important to note that this doesn’t necessarily mean a person engaged with your tweet, but it does give you a sense of how many people your tweets has the potential to reach.

From the screenshot above you will also see you have the option of changing the date range – the default is the last 28 days. You can choose to view the last 7 days or any of the previous 5 months. You also have an option to specify a specific date range.

To the right of the date range selection, you’ll also see the option to Export Data. Clicking on this tab gives you the option to download “by tweet” or “by day” via a .csv file which can be imported to an excel spread sheet – great for reporting.

Now let’s take a closer look at the kind of data we can see on this page. Your tweets are analyzed according to Top Tweets, Tweets and Replies, Promoted Tweets (if you are advertising on Twitter), Impressions, Engagement and Engagement Rate.

We’ve already look at Impressions earlier, so now let’s turn to Engagements. An engagement is an interaction with a tweet ( e.g. likes and retweets. The engagement rate of a tweet is the number of engagements it gets divided by its number of impressions. This is a key metric to track over time.

You can also get a graphic representation of your engagement rate as you can see in the image below.

Looking into your Twitter data in this way is useful to show you how your content is performing on the platform. It gives you insight into the best days to post and which types of content people most like to engage with. If you run a campaign, it’s essential that you track the campaign from the start right through to the end. Keeping a close eye on the data will allow you to to adjust your campaign as you go.

Use the insights you gather from Twitter analytics to inform your social strategy, optimize your content, grow your following and boost your engagement.

To learn more visit the Twitter Analytics page.

You might also like to read the following articles:

Become a Social Media Ninja With These 25 Smart Twitter Hacks

7 Data-Backed Tips To Drive More Engagement on Twitter

Posted in #HCSM, Twitter

The Rise of Patient Communities on Twitter

I am a big fan of Symplur and the service they provide through their healthcare  hashtag project for those of us interested in the health conversations which take place on Twitter.  For over 2 years, Symplur has collected health conversations on Twitter and analyzed them across thousands of variables. The result is produced in this video, a visual representation of   c. 2,000 different health communities or topics.

The green dots symbolizes patient centric topics, while pink encompasses more professional/provider topics. Larger bubbles signifies larger volume of conversations within that community. The data are visualized dynamically over a 2 year period.

Here’s what Symplur research uncovered:

What we discovered was somewhat of a surprise for some. From the start, many considered Twitter as a kind of virtual water cooler, mostly used by healthcare professionals. It’s been thought that the need for privacy would push patients to more closed platforms. Twitter as you know, is totally public and should not be considered private.  However, from what you can clearly observe, the green bubbles have grown in numbers and significance quite dramatically in recent months. This indicates a strong growth of conversations in existing patient communities on Twitter and a strong growth of new patient communities on Twitter within our dataset.